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Old Aug 20, 2004, 12:03 PM   #1
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was wondering if anyone could help out with some aperture, ISO, and shutter speed settings.

The scenario: Indoor low light, with flourescent lights somehwat sparsely scattered. I have a Canon 10d. I am photoghraphing speedskaters(like in the Olympics, just not on ice). I am usually anywhere from 30 feet(at first photo) to 5feet (at last photo in burst mode) away from subjects moving at 15-30mph heading towards and slightly to my side.
It's not hard to take one at a time with a flash, but for my purposes I could really use some settings that would work without a flash.

Not to concerned with noise, not going to

Thanx for any info,

Craig
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Old Aug 20, 2004, 8:32 PM   #2
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Experiment, Experiment, Experiment
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Old Aug 20, 2004, 9:33 PM   #3
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as was said experiment.

also go to the rink before and start to do rough measurements of distances. in the time it takes a skater to move your af may not capture it well. preset manual focus capture areas.

the equation is fairly simple you need an ISO/ speed combination that can get you prefably above 1/125. thentheapeture that will give you the depth of field in one of a few preselected well lit areas you have set as traps for the skaters to enter. in short youmight want to get to know you lenses DOFat certainf stops and its. since it is fairly close up a wide angle lens will give you greater DOF and the ability to capture and possibly crop for creativity. thesmaller the fstop the greater the DOF.total control is in the manual mode.i don't suggest P mode/

you can play at 1/30 for creative blur purposes

another thing is having a handheld incident light meter. to read the light in the spots you want to shoot not just the reflected light. lots of people don't see that there is a difference.

i can through numbers out but they won't help you. knowing how to use your camera and understanding light has to be learned. each situation is different.

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Old Aug 24, 2004, 10:19 AM   #4
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I've been experimenting with settings for a while, I was just trying to get a basline where to better start, lol. Thanx for the info. I appreciate it. I'm new to photography. It's my friends camera. I'm a tech freak so I learn new concepts realted to science and technology quickly.



Craig
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Old Aug 25, 2004, 11:05 AM   #5
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This is why you shouldn't post the same question in different places. I answered you in one of them and I have no idea which that was.

Sigh.

Eric
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