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Old Aug 22, 2004, 7:36 PM   #1
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I will be getting a 20D, but I have some questions. I am new to SLR's so I dont know much about lenses yet. I will mainly focus on landscape and nature photographs. Is there an all-around decent lens for this? If there is more then one decent one,what are all the choices? I do plan on making a business out of this so I am willing to spend a bit, but not too much. Are the kit lenses any good, theres 3 right? Also, about the camera itself, I am extremely worried about an extended warranty. I think I might need one, but is MACK the only choice, and are they trustable? Can I get an extended warranty directly from Canon? Thats it for now. I'm sure I'll have more questions soon.

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Old Aug 22, 2004, 8:37 PM   #2
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For landscapes, I would look hard at the Canon 17-40 f/4L lens. You'll have to define what you mean by"nature" before I could recommend a lens.

The kit lenses are ok for consumer camera use. If you plan on doing photography for business, they will probably not suffice. If you plan on making money on photography, skimping on your lenses to save a few bucks is the wrong thing to do.

I don't care for extended warranties, know nothing about MACK, butpretty surethat Canon doesn't offer an extended warranty directly.
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Old Aug 22, 2004, 8:47 PM   #3
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Sorry, by nature i mean wildlife.
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Old Aug 22, 2004, 9:30 PM   #4
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First off its a 20D not a D20 ... The D preceding the model number imples Nikon gear. Semantics.. I know ...but it drives me crazy when people can't get the camera model right.

And I agree with Ohenry on the lens choice. Especially if you intend on using it to generate revenue. You can find other cheaper lenses, however you will want something durable with a life span.
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Old Aug 22, 2004, 10:38 PM   #5
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Sorry bud but look again, I did say 20D !
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Old Aug 22, 2004, 10:43 PM   #6
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Bladestorm wrote:
Quote:
Sorry bud but look again, I did say 20D !

OMG ... I need to put the beer down and step awat from the keyboard... Read one post and replied to another ... My mistake .. I apologize :?
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Old Aug 22, 2004, 10:48 PM   #7
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For wildlife, you're going to be looking at longer lenses...400mm and longer. Fewer choices available here. Canon makes a 100-400 but for the reach and clarity you need for professional work, you're probably going to want to look at their prime lenses and likely the 500 or 600mm. These are not cheap. There are other options available in the long lens. I've seen some good results coming from the Sigma 50-500. The biggest drawbackon this lens is that you can't effectively use a teleconverter to extend the reach beyond 500mm as you can with the Canon 500 and 600. Tamron has a new 200-500 on the market, but it's aperture is the same as the Sigma so you find yourself in the same dilemma. Both Tamron and Sigma produce a 500 mm prime that may be worth taking a look at. Lastly, Sigma has a 300-800 mm zoom that has gotten some pretty nice reviews. Again, you're talking bucks. There are cheaper alternatives, but as I said in my other reply...if you're doing this to make money, skimping on your lenses is a mistake.
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Old Aug 22, 2004, 11:22 PM   #8
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You have to define what "wildlife" mean. That could be anything from butteryfly macros to lions across the tundra. Without this information, we can't recommend a lens for the job. Think of it like a car recommendation. If I came up to you and said "what car should I buy, I move stuff" You'd need to know what stuff I move before you could reasonable answer the question (it could be great danes or motorcycles.) We need specifics.

I have the 17-40 f4. It's a wonderful lens. Easily wide enough for almost every landscape you throw at it. You don't say what type of business you want to create, so I won't suggest that medium or large format film might be a better choice (only point out that it *might* be a better choice for landscape work.)

And I agree with ohenry's comments about longer lenses. You don't say how much money you are willing to spend, and that guides every decision.

You might also want to check out:
www.naturephotographers.net

To give you an idea of what you are up against when you consider going pro. Some of the best photography I've ever seen is posted there... often.

Eric
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Old Aug 23, 2004, 12:13 AM   #9
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My goal is to sell my photographs online, and at gallerys. Sorry about not being very specific in terms of what kind of wildlife shoots i'd like, thats still up for grabs. I definitely do want toshoot landscape however. So I guess I should go with the 17-40 f4 L then? I dont know what type of photography you would call it, but I live near a great lakes shipping port and would like to take shots of the lakers as well. Would that lens sufice?

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Old Aug 23, 2004, 2:58 PM   #10
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Unless you already have a customer for your photographs, I think you're going to be in for a unpleasant surprise. The competition out there is really really good, and there are many people out there trying to do the exact same thing you want to do.

My word of caution, do not believe you can easily make money by taking pictures of landscapes or wildlife. It's going to be a full time job, with many hours of hard work and little income ahead. Until you get established and then things can improve. Of course it can be done, but it won't be easy.

I would check out www.smugmug.com and email the pro photographers on there and ask them some questions about their business. You might get some good tips.

Then, on to lenses. The 17-40L is a nice wide-angle lens for landscapes. People also take landscape shots with a 300mm lens though. Besides a good lens you'll need a good tripod. Pictures have to be tack sharp if you're going to enlarge them in print.

Good luck!

Barthold
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