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Old Sep 5, 2004, 2:11 PM   #1
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I've noticed that some pictures look washed out. At first, I jst assumed it was due to hazy sky conditions. But after today, I know it's not always the case. I took the attached picture below on a clear sunny day in Rothenberg, Germany (Sun, rare). There was no haze in sight, but this picture still looks a bit washed out in the background. The foreground looks pretty good though. The only thing I can figure is that in Auto Mode, the metering doesn't look that far out and since it takes in the whole frame, it meters mostly the things that are close. I think I will try a different Mode and see what happens. This, of course, is just an amateurs opinion. I would greatly appreciate an opinion from anyone who wants a try. Thanks in advanced.

Dave Porter
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 2:46 PM   #2
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It may also be stray light hitting the lens at a sharp angle. Do you have a lens hood?
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Old Sep 5, 2004, 3:43 PM   #3
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Have you done ANY post processing or is this straight from the camera?




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Old Sep 5, 2004, 4:42 PM   #4
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No, i don't have a lens hood. I used the Kit lens that came with the camera. As for processing, I haven't touched it at all. This is straight out of the camera. All the trees should be close to the same color.

Dave
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Old Sep 6, 2004, 12:22 AM   #5
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I've shot very few images with my Digital Rebel that DIDN'T need some sort of adjustment after the fact. I read before switching to digital SLR's that this was almost a requirement to obtain the best possible image quality, and nothing I've seen the last 9 months has made me think otherwise. You simply cannot expect a digital SLR to produce finished products as you do digicams, which heavily process files internally.

The "problem" has nothing to do with metering "not seeing" that far. Metering is metering- there is no distance range in metering like you have with flash. The file simply needs some post-processing to give you the final quality you want.

I picked your image off and made a couple of minor adjustments (Levels adjustments) in Photoshop Elements- nothing fancy. The colors as I adjusted them may not be exactly "right", but you can definitely get them the way you want. This is software Canon supplies with the camera, and for good reason. You need to use it.

Other Digital Rebel Images:

http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=411185

http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=415096
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Old Sep 6, 2004, 4:36 AM   #6
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A polarizing filter will help a lot also.

richie
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Old Sep 6, 2004, 5:36 AM   #7
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... or a graduated filter: http://www.geocities.com/cokinfilter...adual_gray.htm
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Old Sep 6, 2004, 5:52 AM   #8
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Thanks for the help, I've been wanting to get a polorizing filter for some time now, and now I have a reason.

Dave
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Old Sep 6, 2004, 8:36 AM   #9
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A polarizer may not help, but either will filter out some haze:
1. There's no reflection to "unpolarize"
2. It depends on the angle of the sun is to the canera... it might (or might not) darken out the sky
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Old Sep 6, 2004, 9:58 AM   #10
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Looking at the histogram, the tonal range of this shot far exceeds the capabilities of the camera. You have some significant overexposure on the highlights as well as losing some details in the shadows. NHL's suggestion for a graduated ND filter is your best bet (or use photoshop to blend two pictures). IIf you don't want to do any post processing with your camera (as many people prefer not to do), you will probably want to boost your parameter settings upwards to suit your tastes.
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