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Old Oct 26, 2004, 10:21 PM   #1
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OK have been shooting with the Nikon 5400 and there are not a good number of ISO settings available and it does not do well under low light conditions. I have a Canon ELAN 7 in which I could use the same lenses if I were to purchase a DSLR.

However my question is

1)Will going to a 10 or 20D help in low light conditions? I saw some of the 20D samples (the football player) and I noticed quite a bit of noise in it.

2)Shots take inside focused on someone inside... The window is all white. Would going to a cmaera with more ISO settings help with this issue (I forgot the term) I know there are ways to take multiple shots and merge the shots together but that is not what I am going for here.

I looked at the Dig Rebel and it didnt seem like it has all the ISO settings I was looking for.

As a side note reviewing some cameras again by Steve... Does he own alot of cameras? It seems every camera review I have read from non slrs > slrs have a great rating with very few problems???

Thanks

KM

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Old Oct 27, 2004, 2:08 AM   #2
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Not if you don't know how to use it...a camera is only as good as the photographer using it! A good car will stil get into an accident as well as a cheap car if the person behind the wheel doesn't know how to drive.

A professional photographer can take a better picture with the cheapest point & shoot camera on the market, than a novice equipped with a dSLR can.

When you say the window is "all white" you didn't mention whether it's from daylight, or reflection from a flash...in any case merely using a dSLR won't stop either situation.

If it's from a flash, move the subject away from the window and/or point the flash away from the window (bounce the (external) flash off a wall or ceiling.

If it's from daylight, there are a few solutions...first, move the subject so they aren't near the window. Second, close the drapes or use a sheet of neutral density plastic over the window to darken the amount of light coming in. Third, USE the window light to light up the subject.
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Old Oct 27, 2004, 2:54 AM   #3
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Thanks for the metaphors

The camera not having a wide enough Dynamic Range I think is what they call it to over both the outdoor and indoor.

I do not wish to cover the windows. It is due to the daylight. Most of the shooting I do is inside the structure there is no suject but the room itself.

KM
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Old Oct 27, 2004, 8:41 AM   #4
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Exposure latitude is lower on digital camera than on the best films. So if you really, really need shots in complex light/dark environments with digital, you should probably try doing multiple exposures and blend the pictures.

You can do it with digital, but there is little slop between a bright spot and blowing the higlight.

The noise characteristics int he 5400 will be worse than a DSLR, so you would be able to use higher ISO (but again, this is a question of your standards. To some its good enough, to others it isn't.) I find with the 10D that I can use at ISO400 and use noise reduction software and the picture is good. I doubt that ISO400 is much use on the 5400.

I would guess the window is all white because it's blown out. The exposure was set for the room, and the bright window then becomes a blob.

I believe Steve is sent promotional cameras so he can write his reviews. I don't know that for a fact.

Eric
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Old Oct 27, 2004, 8:58 AM   #5
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This picwas taken with the 20d at ISO3200 (Highest). It was indoors on a relatively dull day with weak indoor lighting. The shutter was at 1250th/sec!!!! and F.3.2. This quality is incredible, and I would say highly usable if you really needed to use this setting.
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Old Oct 27, 2004, 12:31 PM   #6
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Yes, that isn't bad. Especially for that high an ISO. And it looks even better because it was reduced (and not cropped.) But to me, I can see the noise clearly visible in the board going up the picture (to the point that it gets in the way of the wood grain.) I don't think it would have held up as well in a print (which demands more detail.)

On the other hand, I see little noise in the cow piece which is white (I expected some there.)

My understanding is that noise in the 20D is "different" but not "better". From a scientific test of the 20D's noise vs. the 10Ds. This basically fits with what I've seen with my own eyes looking at posted un-noise-reduced images. Personally, I have high standards... ISO400 does look slightly better (not less noisey) but still not great and ISO800 wasn't directly usable. So by buying the 20D I don't gain a stop. With the quality of noise reduction software now, that means (to me) that there is little difference. Now, if I gained a stop with the 20D I'd already own one. It's still tempting because of the better AF, but I'm not leaping out to buy one.

Eric
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