Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 2, 2004, 1:26 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
charlie1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10
Default

Have resently bought a 300d,yesterday actually and no matter what setting i try the photo is always slightly out of focus. This is also the case when i use manual focus.no it,s not my eye sight as all the family agree.My old fuji a203 costing £90 produces sharper photos.Please help as i am about ready to take it back to the shop.
charlie1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 3, 2004, 9:45 AM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Chances are, you are only observing the amount of sharpness being applied to the image by the camera.

Sharpness is an optical illusion that usually works by increasing the contrast at edges in a subject. This is not the real detail captured by the camera.

When too much sharpening is applied, it can make a photo look artificial, with halos around edges when viewed a larger sizes. So, most users prefer to keep it set low, then add sharpening later (you can always add more later, but ifthe camera adds too much, you can't take it away).

As a general rule, a DSLR model will use more conversative sharpening algorithms to reduce unwanted artificats. The same usually applies to other in camera processing (contrast, saturation, etc.).

If you have an image editor, you can apply sharpening later (either normal sharpening, or Unsharp Mask).

You can also adjust it higher via camera settings (although you may find that an editor produces better results).


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 3, 2004, 9:51 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
aladyforty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 6,964
Default

have you adjusted the diopter to your eye? It could be that you dont have it adjusted to your eye properly, or you could take it back and get the shop to test it themselves and see if they can take an in focus shot. Ive got a 300D and never found it out of focus (unless it is my error). I will admit that my G3 was very sharp straight out of the camera and when I first went DSLR I noticed that the shots needed more work but the finished product is better.
aladyforty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 3, 2004, 11:51 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Setiprime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 484
Default

Hey Charlie -

where is the photo

What lens are you using (make/model)

what "mode" are you in

If no photo - what is the subject

Give us a little help so we can help you.
Setiprime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 3, 2004, 5:04 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
charlie1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10
Default

Thanks for you reply however today I returned the 300d to the shop and got my money back.They tested the camera and they couldn't get any sharp images either,so they took some more photos on a different 300d and the results where a lot better but I lost my trust in the camera .Wondering what camera to go for now. Any ideas.
charlie1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 3, 2004, 5:09 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
charlie1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10
Default

Thanks for your input but today returned the camera to the shop for testing and yes they could not get any in focus shots,so they tried another 300d and the results where better.Was undecided what to do so i got my money back,so just wondering what to go for now any ideas.
charlie1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 4, 2004, 8:49 PM   #7
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

charlie1 wrote:
Quote:
Thanks for your input but today returned the camera to the shop for testing and yes they could not get any in focus shots,so they tried another 300d and the results where better.Was undecided what to do so i got my money back,so just wondering what to go for now any ideas.
You'll need to decide what you are looking for in a camera.

A DSLR model like the Canon EOS-300D gives you a lot that you won't have in a non-DSLR model. There are also a some disadvantages:

LCD Framing: unlike a consumer (or "prosumer") camera, the LCD can't be used for framing on a DSLR.

Lens Cost: To get the same focal range you can find in a consumer level (non-DSLR) camera, you often have to spend much more money, especially to get lenses that are as "fast" (widest apertures available at wide angle and zoom). To get all the features (macro performance, zoom range, etc.), you must often purchase multiple lenses (and many users do).

Camera Size/Weight: Because of the larger sensors used in most Digital SLR cameras, the lenses also have to be larger and heavier for the same focal ranges/light gathering ability.

Sensor Cleaning: When you swap lenses, you risk dust getting into the the sensor.

Features: you often don't get the "bells, whistles and buzzers" found on a consumer model in a DSLR (i.e., sound recording, panaroma modes, movie modes, etc.).

A Few Advantages to a Digital SLR:

A true "Through the Lens Optical Viewfinder"

Ability to Shoot at Higher ISO speeds with lower noise. DSLR's have much larger sensors, with better signal to noise ratios as CCD sensitivity is amplifed for higher ISO speeds. Often, a DSLR is the only tool that will work well for indoor sports, and other conditions requiring the ability to shoot at higher ISO speeds (but you need to have a bright lens to go with one).

Fast Focus Speeds -- Most Digital SLR's use a Phase Detection Focus System which is extremely fast. Most Consumer Grade Cameras use a Contrast Detection Focus System which is much slower.

Ability to Control Depth of Field - The smaller sensors used in a Consumer Grade Camera limit your ability to control Depth of Field (blur backgrounds by using wider apertures). This is because Depth of Field is based on the Actual (versus 35mm) equivalent focal length of the lens(and a much shorter focal length lens can be used on a consumer model, to get the same equivalent focal length in a DSLR). So, you've got much more control over Depth of Field via Aperture Settings with a DSLR.

Of course, some users may not care about blurring backgrounds to help their subjects stand out, and may like the greater DOF (more of a photo in focus) a non-DSLR camera would have at a given 35mm equivalent focal length, aperture, and focus distance. So, depending on your perspective, this could be looked at as an advantage, or a disadvantage to a DSLR.

Lenses become an investment - With a Digital SLR, when you upgrade your camera body later, you can take your lenses with you within the same manufacturer (at least until someone comes out with a new lens mount system that's not backwards compatible). :shock: With a consumer grade camera, the lenses are permanently attached.

Speed of Writes - The processors used in most Digital SLR's are faster than the processors used in consumer grade cameras. As a result the camera's overall operation is usually much faster.

A few other comments:

Both types of cameras can be great for many users. Some users have both (a compact consumer model good for most shooting situations, that is much easier to carry); as well as a Digital SLR (with multiple lenses).

There are pros and cons to both approaches.

What were you looking for in a camera? Did you have a budget in mind?

The Canon EOS-300D/Digital Rebel is currently the lowest cost DSLR model you can buy (but the camera is only part of the investment, and many users spend far more on lenses compared to the initial camera body cost).


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 5, 2004, 6:03 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
charlie1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 10
Default

Thanks for your reply Jim C. Have looked closely in photo shop at some of the photos I took with the 300 d and I think you have hit the nail on the head,not beinguse to the depth of field. Most photos I took only one small section was actually in focus. Whilst this can have a good effect in some shots in others it does not, can this be controlled in any way ? ie make more of the shot in focus. Another problem i had was under exposure,even with the built in flash (settings to auto).

Any way have decided to go and re-purchase the 300d asI am sure there are answers to my concerns. Also have just noticed the fine detail when zooming in on thefocused parts of the photo.

Many thanks.
charlie1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 5, 2004, 6:16 PM   #9
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

charlie1 wrote:
Quote:
... I think you have hit the nail on the head, not being use to the depth of field. Most photos I took only one small section was actually in focus. Whilst this can have a good effect in some shots in others it does not, can this be controlled in any way ? ie make more of the shot in focus.
Several ways to increase the DOF:

1 - Close the aperture down -> use a higher f-number in Av mode
2 - Shoot from further away -> the DOF increases as one get away from the a subject
3 - Use wider zoom -> the tele position will decrease DOF while the wide angle will increase it

You can use this plot to see the various range of aperture: http://www.dof.pcraft.com/dof-frames.cgi
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 6, 2004, 1:22 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 184
Default

charlie1



You should have kept the 300d, I too had focus problems when first purchased but like you I had been using a prosumer digital prior to the purchase. This just spoils your vision of SLRs because they make it too easy to achieve good focus but they also make it hard to control the focus to get good effects. I plodded on with mine and I'm now very happy with it. My pics are now much better because I'm learning to use the SLR properly.

Don't give up, a DSLR is well worth it if you want to do some serious photography.

IMHO

cheers

Mart.
mf_blues is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:40 PM.