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Old Nov 4, 2004, 5:55 PM   #1
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I like to shoot infrared B&W photography with my digital camera (Olympus) but I am considering purchasing either the Canon 10D or 20D. Does anyone know if either of these two camera sensors are IR capable?

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Old Nov 7, 2004, 9:01 AM   #2
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No, these cameras like most dSLRs have a lowpass filter that filters out IR (infra red). You can get a prosumer digicam if you want to shoot IR. One way to tell for sure is to shoot a photo of a remote control with a button pressed. If the camera can detect IR, you will see it as a bright spot at the end of the remote.
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Old Nov 8, 2004, 11:25 PM   #3
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I already use my Olympus C-5050 for IR photography, but thought I could use the 10D or 20D for IR photography as well. Do you have any idea why the digital SLRs don't accommodate IR photography?
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Old Nov 9, 2004, 10:14 AM   #4
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FYI: http://www.canon.com/technology/deta...5mm/lo_filter/

You can try it with a Hoya R72, it just takes veryyyy... veryyyyyyy long shutter speed since the camera is highly insensitive to this region!
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Old Nov 9, 2004, 10:52 AM   #5
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Two of my friends at the local Country Images Camera Club are making quite nice infrared images. One is using a10D with the HOYA filter, the other is using a D70 with a B&W infrared filter.

I took a peek while they were shooting and you can't see what you are shooting until after the camera finishes the exposure(viewfinder is blacked out with the filter attached), and it looks like exposure times are in the10's of seconds.

These filters are not cheep, if you can locate a cokin #7 filter(quite new to the market) it is also an infrared filter but not quite as expensive as the glass ones.


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Old Jul 28, 2006, 3:25 PM   #6
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Hi PeterP,

I now have my 10D camera and took a few IR shots using a R72 filter. The problem I have now is that I have a hot spot in the center of every photo regardless of the shooting mode. Any suggestions?


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Old Jul 28, 2006, 4:41 PM   #7
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How long of a shutter?
If it is too long then the elements are saturating in which case you're out of luck :idea:
(open up the aperture or irradiate with more infrared... :G)

-> Best is to (have someone) remove the internal filter for IR shots: http://www.lifepixel.com/IR.htm

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Old Jul 28, 2006, 8:29 PM   #8
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If I'm not mistaken, Canon did (or still does) manufacture the 20D without the filter in front of the sensor. I think it was called 20D a (the "a" stands for astronomy). Since we're talking about a very small target audience, they did not produce many of them, and the ones they did put out cost about 50% more than the standard 20D. I'm sure if you would do a google search you might be able to find said body somewhere.

Also, youcan still use that body for non-ir photography simply by attaching an IR filter to your lens.

TT
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Old Jul 28, 2006, 9:01 PM   #9
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wsandman1 wrote:
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No, these cameras like most dSLRs have a lowpass filter that filters out IR (infra red). You can get a prosumer digicam if you want to shoot IR. One way to tell for sure is to shoot a photo of a remote control with a button pressed. If the camera can detect IR, you will see it as a bright spot at the end of the remote.
You sure that's good enough?
I can see the IR LED even with my P&S
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Old Jul 28, 2006, 10:26 PM   #10
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That's exactly what I'm was trying to say. Point & shoot models don't have low pass filters and you can tell because the infra-red beam from the remote shows up on the LCD's live view dSLRs have low pass filters, making UV photos difficult. I mentioned pro-sumer models because they should provide beter image quality and more flexibilty than a P/S.
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