Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 6, 2004, 1:30 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 184
Default

Is it just me or do all the new DSLRs and SLRs lack a Focusing spot to aid manual Focusing.

I have a 300D and a 500N and niether have a Focus Spot, it really does make manual focus awkward.

I haven't used many DSLRs so I may be wrong here, but I do wish my 300D and my 500N had one.

cheers

Mart.
mf_blues is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 6, 2004, 5:34 AM   #2
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

Yeap... They took the split screen / fresnel ring away figuring you don't need them anymore since the AF cameras can do the focus for you :G

IMO the bigger issue now is the popular cheaper zooms with variable aperture... With slower f-stop 1/2 of that focusing spot will turn dark !!!
-> Big complaints from the camera's owners which the manufacturers want to avoid :idea:

The other issue is Canon has moved away from parafocal zoom with their EF lenses, ie the focusing changes as one zooms in or out. The user can observe this with a split-screen... Check out the Nikon (or Sigma/Tokina) lenses sometime, their focus hold! :-):-):-)
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 7, 2004, 11:42 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 184
Default

Thanks for the reply NHL.

I did like the split screen, never had much trouble with one half going black but it did happen now and again. Not much of a problem though IMHO. I find Manual Focusing very awkward without the focusing aid and there are many situations where MF is better than AF.

After looking at some reviews it looks like the top end EOS cameras like the MKII have interchangeable focusing screens, so I'll just have to save me pennies and buy one of them instead. :|

cheers

Mart.
mf_blues is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 8, 2004, 11:35 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
hedwards's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 190
Default

And for the archives,
For me as well as some people using the non dominant eye can result in a better quality and precision of focus. Just food for thought:-)
hedwards is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 9, 2004, 10:31 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 192
Default

I've done some tests with manual and auto-focusing, and using the Canon angle finder C. The best combination, which is about dead-on with my 20D, is to manually focus with the angle finder at 2.5x and also use the focus indicator.

What gives? Why doesn't auto-focus give the same effect? Because, I think, that auto-focus is also designed to be fast -- get within the stated performance requirement quickly without hunting as much as possible. If you use the focus indicator together with some manual hunting, then it's likely that you can get the best of both worlds in terms of precise but not fastfocusing.

The following focus test is also useful -- to check if you have an equipment problem, and to get some more experience focusing and evaluating your results. Print out the image, put an object on it, and focus on the object and check where your point of focus ends up being on the image. Also watch the pattern of bars move as you change focus. Do this with a tethered camera if possible for quicker feedback on every image.

http://www.photo.net/learn/focustest/

Or just give up and shoot at f/16



Madwand is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:53 AM.