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Old Feb 1, 2005, 1:21 PM   #11
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Do you find it interesting that you never hear a George Lepp or other professional photographers complaining about this issue in any review they might write? Does it make you think that perhaps when they order a camera, that Canon sticks a big "Pro Photographer" or "Camera Reviewer" tag on the camera and it gets extra attention to make sure it goes out of there right?

Seems like only the amateurs seem to have a problem.

Getting a 20D in a few days and crossing my fingers.

Mark
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Old Feb 1, 2005, 4:31 PM   #12
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Pro photographers don't complain about this issue publicly because they (should) know the issues when comparing P&S sharpness to DSLR sharpness -- that the DSLR may seem/be unsharp because: (1) The greater depth of field of the P&S cameras due to their focal lengths being much smaller. (2) The more "aggressive" in-camera sharpening that's done by P&S cameras.

To deal with this in DSLRs (and any larger-format cameras), you need to understand how to use smaller apertures; using tripods when appropriate, and need to learn how to apply sharpening (whether in-camera or outside).
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Old Feb 1, 2005, 4:42 PM   #13
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Also remember that the amount of sharpening you apply needs to be matched to your final print size. This is another advantage of DSLR - you can adjust your degree of sharpening accordingly.

With 4x6 prints for example you should probably view on screen in PS at about 35%: sharpening that looks good at 100% is not suitable for 4x6 prints - it can look over-sharpened.

If you have a good quality photo-printer it's easy to verify this by experimenting until you find the settings you like for different print sizes.

Also it's worth remembering that sharpness is quite subjective and you don't always want an image that appears too sharp and it's much easier to add a bit than take away.
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Old Feb 2, 2005, 3:50 PM   #14
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So why spend all this money on our 20D and have to use some kind of sharpening program to get the pictures we like. Is it the camera and lens thats takeing the picture or is it Photoshops USM? Im haveing a huge problem with it. I set here and fix my photos and i just can't get it out of my head, Why spend all this money for the camera and lens if i have to us USM to get a sharp picture. Is it the camera and lens talking the picture or is it USM. Thank you.
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Old Feb 2, 2005, 4:07 PM   #15
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drummer5140 wrote:
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So why spend all this money on our 20D and have to use some kind of sharpening program to get the pictures we like. Is it the camera and lens thats takeing the picture or is it Photoshops USM? Im haveing a huge problem with it. I set here and fix my photos and i just can't get it out of my head, Why spend all this money for the camera and lens if i have to us USM to get a sharp picture. Is it the camera and lens talking the picture or is it USM. Thank you.
It's NEITHER the camera and the lens NOR the USM "taking the picture."It's YOU taking the picture-- and doing what it takes before, during, and after the shutter clicks to make it a good one.

That would be like Ansel Adams saying "Gee, why did I learn how do process my negatives so well in the darkroom? If I've got this great large format camera and I've learned how to expose images perfectly using my confusing zone system, why can't I just take my pictures to Wal-Mart (or the equivalent in his time) and have them developed by any Joe Teenager?" The fact is that users EXPECT images coming out of professional cameras to need some manipulation. Because if the image came out of the camera "perfect," 70% of the time that "perfection" is NOT what the photographer would want... and there would be no good way to fix it. Read the thread above for explanations why you need to use USM or highpass filters to sharpen and perform other post processing. I think it explains it pretty well.

Your statement is based on a fallacy---that better equipment leads to better pictures with less work. That's simply not the case. All parts of advanced photography require extra time and patience. I'm learning that now. The result is that, in most circumstances, you have the possibility of getting a much better image than you can get with a point and shoot. But without time, talent, and training (i.e. practice) you're not going to get better pics; in fact, you might do BETTER with a point and shoot that makes all of the decisions for you (but may often make incorrect decisions or may limit what you can do creatively).


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Old Feb 2, 2005, 8:08 PM   #16
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:?sjms; thanks for explaining more of what happens when shooting in raw. Didn't realize all sharpening was turned off.

Much to learn about this stuff.
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 2:55 AM   #17
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I use C1 software but I expect that most good RAW developing programs are similar;

I have set the default sharpening to what I like most of the time. Now I don't have to think about it much. When I come across an image that needs more or less sharpening, I adjust it. It's not a burden.

I usually fiddle with exposure and WB a lot more than sharpening.

If you shoot jpg, or use a P&S, the default sharpening is what you get. You can sharpen more in editing software but you can't go backwards

regards

David
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 4:30 PM   #18
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I think this stuff is starting to make sense to me. It's kind of analogous to printing on low contrast paper when you're used to higher contrast photo lab prints.
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 5:16 PM   #19
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I initially had the same problem using my Panasonic FZ20. Coming from an Olympus pns, I realized that I had to manipulate the photos. I think if you want to just do point and shoot work and not worry about post processing maybe you should carry around a little digicam (I hear the canons are great and I like the olympus') in your camera bag with your 20D and switch to it when you just want simple shots that you can just upload to shutterfly.
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 4:17 PM   #20
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I just tried this PlugIn. It has real potential!!!!
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