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Old Nov 1, 2002, 1:22 PM   #1
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Default B&W and Infrared with Canon D-60

B&W and Infrared with Canon D-60?:

Is it at all possible to make B&W and/or infrared images in the field…or in post-production? Indeed…can it be done digitally at all?

Many thanks.

M i k e
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Old Nov 8, 2002, 12:42 AM   #2
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For digi-IR info try these sites:

http://www.echeng.com/photo/infrared/

http://irdreams.com/

http://www.pixelagogo.com/Nikon990/Nikon990.html

Most all digicams can do IR, all you need is the right
filter(s) and a tripod.

-Steve
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Old Nov 9, 2002, 9:22 PM   #3
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I've actually wondered about the B&W thing too. I have a D60 and there doesn't seem to be a menu option to select between color and B&W. Anyone have any ideas? I know I can do it in Photoshop, but I'd like to be able to use my filters, shoot in B&W, and have a "closer to finish" image when I import into Photoshop. Something about modifying images in Photoshop that feels like cheating

Norm
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Old Nov 9, 2002, 10:46 PM   #4
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IR is not practical with a D60 or even the D30.

Both have an IR blocking filter. The blocking filter in the D30 is not quite as effective as the D60. The D60 filter leaves you with exposures of several minutes.

Also, the D30 and D60 are SLRs. With an IR filter on the camera, you see nearly nothing.

Some digicams lack IR blocking. Those will work. You can use their LCD screens to review the image.

Mitch
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Old Nov 11, 2002, 8:18 PM   #5
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Mitch,

I understand the infrared issue, but what about B&W? Any way to shoot in B&W mode with the D60? I've been converting with Photoshop but would love to be able to do it natively with the camera.

Norm
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Old Nov 13, 2002, 10:01 AM   #6
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@norm911

No, not possible to do B&W with the D60 nor D30 nor EOS 1D nor EOS 1Ds. Their consumer cameras have the option where basically the lumincance levels from the Bayer filter are compensated to get the appropriate B&W levels. Option is not implemented though on their Semi Pro and Pro cameras.

Regards ......
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Old Nov 13, 2002, 2:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norm911
Mitch,

I understand the infrared issue, but what about B&W? Any way to shoot in B&W mode with the D60? I've been converting with Photoshop but would love to be able to do it natively with the camera.

Norm
Nope. No function on the camera for that.

Fred Miranda has an action for B&W, duotones, tritones, etc. that I use and like very much.

Also, there are profiles that come with Photoshop 6 for creating various duotones, etc. I haven't checked my Photoshop 7 installation.

Getting good B&W prints with an ink jet is hard. It's not just a camera issue. Black ink is dithered to get various grey shades. It's hard to get 255 values with ink jet inks. So you will likely have better luck with a duotone image. (Duotones, tritones, etc. were created to overcome the dynamic range limitation of many black inks.)

You see few duotones in printing, because they're more expensive. with an ink jet, however, that's not a big issue. You're not making lithographic screens. So it is quite easy to create duotones and get better contrast when you make monochrome images.

Have fun!

Mitch
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Old Nov 14, 2002, 9:35 AM   #8
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If you go to your Photoshop program directory, you'll find a subdirectory called Presets. Under that is a directory called Duotones.

That's where you find the presets for creating a variety of duotones.

Cheers,

Mitch
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Old Nov 21, 2002, 2:49 PM   #9
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I am here only to check traffic on the new eos 1D but have researched the IR in digital photography field extensively, and can offer the following info:
On one of the comments regarding the in-camera IR filters, they are called hot mirrors and are practically in every digicam, as the ccd architecture used in such has a pretty high radiation absorbancy latitude. This does make exposures longer with IR filters, but the effect in almost all digicams are really good. In either case, there is a very good way of quickly checking how good your camera's IR blocking is: tun the lights down in your living room, turn on the camera and point your tv control to it while pressing any of the buttons. If you can see the transmitter LED go bright, your camera can succesfully be used to record IR.There is also a website i have frequented that i could probably find for you, which goes through a dissection of a couple of cameras to remove the hot mirror, but it voids (no kidding) the warranties.
I can see one major advantage of a cannon slr over the fixed lens digicams in IR photography: the existense of the IR red mark on the lens to adjust the focusing to the near IR wavelength.

For a lot of good info on IR, check the following sites:

http://infrareddreams.com/
http://tedfelix.com/IR/
http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/infrared/
http://www.echeng.com/photo/infrared/tutorial/

PS: it is surprising to hear that you cannot shoot BW in these canons ( the main advantage to doing so being a much smaller file for the same photo in BW as opposed to colour), but you are better off shooting colour anyway and changing it in photoshop. In my trip from film to digital, i realised that i started cheating the moment i could preview the shot in the lcd.
PS2: you cannot succesfully turn an image to an "IR looking" one in post-processing.
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Old Nov 21, 2002, 10:57 PM   #10
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8) Numerous posts on the forums have stated that it is preferable to shoot in color and then convert to B&W on the PC, and several have given detailed instructions for how best to do it. It has also been covered in at least 3 magazine articles in the past year.
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