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Old Jan 2, 2005, 3:36 PM   #1
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Canon 1Dmk2. Noticed a couple of large tuffs of dust. They came off easily with a hand blower. Months later I was doing a few high precision images and found a few more spots. I can't get them off using air (even tried a small airbrush compressor to get a continuous stream of low pressure air).

Looking back with a closer inspection, these small spots were there before I cleaned the larger specs off. Looking at them, I am beginning to think they might be sensor defects (one pixel dark when stopped). But they do change size - which says they aren't really in the sensor.

The biggest problem is I am now aware of them, and want them gone. Before sending the camera in, any suggestions on what works to remove stubborm dust?

Tim

Update: I tried all the tips sent in. See my results at:

http://www.tmargeson.net/Specks/index.htm

Summary: DON'T USE TAPE !

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Old Jan 2, 2005, 3:58 PM   #2
CW
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I have not tried this myself yet.

It is highly reccomended by The Luminous Landscape site and Rob Galbraith's site

Supposed to be the best way yet, it is designed for cleaning chips.

Visible Dust

here is the link:

http://www.visibledust.ca/

Good Luck,

CW
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Old Jan 3, 2005, 11:19 AM   #3
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TDM-

Yup - Visible Dust. Well worth the money and no messy swabs+ fluids, etc.

Works VERY well !!
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Old Jan 3, 2005, 12:54 PM   #4
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Try this web site it might be helpfull

http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning
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Old Jan 4, 2005, 2:46 PM   #5
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Hi Everyone. Although my suggestion is a bit expensive, I know what I'm talking about. I am a Process Engineer for a company (DALSA) that manufactures industrial quality CCD's. I work in our Cleanroom Environment and dust is our main enemy. To clean particulate from the surface of our devices we use "Opticlean Polymer" distributed by "Dantronix". Do a Google search to check it out. It is basically a polymer that is like nail polish but dries to a tack. It is usually painted on like nail polish and then a sticker is placed on top. When the sticker is peeled off, it removes the polymer and dust. We don't use it that way though. We use a fine point swab (nylon" and just dip it in to form a small droplet. when the droplet dries to a tack, you just touch it to the dust and it will lift it off with no residue behind. Unfortunately it will cost you $100 for two bottles that come in the kit. Large dust particles can be removed with blowing air. The smaller the particle, the more surface attraction it has and the harder it is to remove. The only way is by actual physical contact (momentum transfer or lift off).



Bob




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Old Jan 6, 2005, 9:46 PM   #6
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eek. I'd get paranoid putting something like "nail polish" on a sensor and pulling something off of it. But if you work for a company that does that, you know what you're talking about (though I'd be too parnoid to try it).

So far I've done well with my "rechargeable" air can. Doesn't use chemicals, just air that's refilled via a pump. Done correctly (as in gently and not a full flow of air) I've kept dust off. I recently had a friend bring his D60 over that had about a dozen pretty visible specs of dirt on the pics, and this route took off 10 of them leaving only 2 just barely visible ones. Again, not for everyone to do though unless it's done right. If you use a chemical air can and put a full blast of air in there, you could damage the sensor.



Greg


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Old Jan 10, 2005, 12:34 AM   #7
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I normally itch to get something right out of a store, I pretty much picked up the speck grabber for bout 20$, seems to do the trick pretty well, you pretty much just grab the visible specs you see on the screen with a blue rubber tip it seems. It does seem to work rather well. Also comes with a static free cloth and fluid ( not for the sensor glass of course but more for the lens and mirror ). It works for me, but I've noticed something called sensorswabs that seem to work rather well.
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Old Jan 11, 2005, 6:55 PM   #8
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i have owned 3 Dslrs now a 1Ds(sold) and currently a 1dm2 and a 1Dsm2. i have used them faily heavily and they are an investment.i still manage to keep the imagers fairly clean without any real problem. when it has been necessary to do so i have kept it to the simplest method possible. a giottos rocket and the body pointed down while cleaning.i have purchased one of the sensor brushes (ouch!) and on occasion use that too for the more stubborn bits.these total havebeen successful on all occasions. other methods mentioned here are so sophisticated and complex that i just find them to be way overkill. but then thats my opinion. if done improperly these methods can possibly damage your equipment. keep it simple.

do remember that you are cleaning the AA filter not the imager itself.
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Old Jan 12, 2005, 12:29 AM   #9
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sjms wrote:
Quote:
*snip*
other methods mentioned here are so sophisticated and complex that i just find them to be way overkill. but then thats my opinion. if done improperly these methods can possibly damage your equipment. keep it simple.

do remember that you are cleaning the AA filter not the imager itself.
I agree that if cleaning is not done properly, it could damage something. However, there's always particles in the air, which could eventually deposit on the ccd in a way that may not be easily removed by just puffing air on it alone. In that case, dedicated chemical cleaning may be needed.
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Old Jan 12, 2005, 11:00 AM   #10
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guess i haven't run into that yet in 3 years and a few trips around the block with them.
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