Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 14, 2005, 8:15 AM   #1
AMG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 144
Default

Hi all, I would like to know if getting the canon digital rebel is a good idea. My concerns are the following:

1. a plastic body - is that too cheap, am I asking for trouble. I would be quite careful, as I always am, and I would be the only one using it.

2. auto white balance. I hear it`s not so good in that department, and I won`t always want to manually set it. But if I capture in RAW, can I not change the white point prior to the image being processed.

Those are the only problems I`m concerned about I guess. Mostly pics of my kids, but I have a canon elan 7e which is 35mm, which is a step above the 35mm rebel. The problem is having to develop film, and often, the colors are off due to the lab. I`d have to scan in the photo, correct it in photoshop and then reprint it. What a pain. But I love the look of a photo from a good lens, outdoors especially. Another huge motivation for this camera is my lens and my flash will be compatable with the new rebel, saving me money in equipment. So in summary, I`d love to hear your thoughts and experiences.

Thanks all
AMG is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 14, 2005, 10:12 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1
Default

AMG wrote:
Quote:
Hi all, I would like to know if getting the canon digital rebel is a good idea. My concerns are the following:

1. a plastic body - is that too cheap, am I asking for trouble. I would be quite careful, as I always am, and I would be the only one using it.

2. auto white balance. I hear it`s not so good in that department, and I won`t always want to manually set it. But if I capture in RAW, can I not change the white point prior to the image being processed.

Those are the only problems I`m concerned about I guess. Mostly pics of my kids, but I have a canon elan 7e which is 35mm, which is a step above the 35mm rebel. The problem is having to develop film, and often, the colors are off due to the lab. I`d have to scan in the photo, correct it in photoshop and then reprint it. What a pain. But I love the look of a photo from a good lens, outdoors especially. Another huge motivation for this camera is my lens and my flash will be compatable with the new rebel, saving me money in equipment. So in summary, I`d love to hear your thoughts and experiences.

Thanks all
I wouldn't worry about the plastic body at ALL. They are very solid and I assume like you say you would take good care of it as you would with a metal body the same.

You are exactly right with RAW you dont even have to care about any of the settings as you will do this ALL post processing including the white balance settings.

Sit back and enjoy!
328iGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 11:19 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 40
Default

I agree with the first poster. I have hadd my D-Rebel for 14 months now. The plastic body is really not an issue at all and more robust than people think. If you capture in raw you can adjust as needed. I use both RAW and JPEG (depending on what I am doing). For the most part, the Camera's white balance does a good job. Where I have noticed problems is in tungsten light espically if the light comes from cheap blubs like the kind my in-laws buy at Wal-Mart where they get 8 for 99 cents. Those lights are even more orange than good quality blubs and in those conditions theRebel seems to not get this correct very often.I have not had a problemhowever correcting thatcondition in Photoshop so it is not a show stopper. Where I think the Rebel falls down is in its e-ttl flash which is realtouchy in my view. I have access to a 420EX flash unit and have had very mixed results with it (and the built in flash). You need to be very careful as to what focus point(s) the camera is using when using the flash to avoid over/underexpoused pictures (usually the later). If you are careful, the Rebel will do a good job.

WJL100
WJL100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 12:44 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 378
Default

I also agree. The plastic body may be of a concern for a National Geographic photographer or an embedded journalist in Iraq, but it's not a big deal for most of us.

White balance has generally been good for me... I will admit, though that the manual mode is a pain. Being an SLR, you have to take a picture of something white in your particular lighting conditions, go to the menu, select the picture, and tell the camera to white balance to it. But, I have never been in a situation that requiredme to use it (yes, I have had to do some color correction in post, especially in mixed-lighting situations, but I have never experienced a frame of all blue, or all orange).

I also agree about the flash... if not careful in my experience, an E-TTL flash on the Rebel may underexpose (but then I'm not very good with flashes, so...) This is especially of concernsince the Rebel does not have FEC built in to the camera. You either need a flash with FEC or to install the "firmware hack" (which for me works very very well). I'm sure that NHL will post about how stupid I am, and that I'm not using the right kind of metering or the exposure lock properly ... but this is in no way meant to dissuade you... outside of the other considerations you didn't mention (like the rumors of a "Rebel II" by February) I think the camera's great.


perdendosi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 2:00 PM   #5
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

perdendosi wrote:
Quote:
I'm sure that NHL will post about how stupid I am, and that I'm not using the right kind of metering or the exposure lock properly ...
Sorry if I come across that way! :lol: :lol: :lol:
What I can say is your 'exposure locked' subject is too bright (ie not neutral) like the tone of a grey card which the camera is calibrated for -> the camera will underexpose :G

BTW I also gave up on the E-TTL at time and resorted to my old Metz 45CT-5 on Auto instead...
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 2005, 2:07 PM   #6
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

I also agree the stated concerns should not dissuade you. But, I would at least wait another month to see if they are releasing another version which would allow you to a) buy existing Rebel at a sligthly more discounted rate as stores reduce stock or b) get whatever improvements are coming by buying the new model. The only other option which makes sense given you already have Canon lenses/flash is a 20D which is twice the cost of the 300D. And I wouldn't recommend buying a 20D JUST because of the better build quality. There's no doubt the 20D is better, but it comes down to whether or not you would use the added benefits and whether they are worth an extra $600-$700 to you.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2005, 8:29 AM   #7
AMG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 144
Default

thanks for the great advice everyone, I think I will go for it, by the summer for sure, so plenty of time to see if they release the 2 and drop the price. I`ll be happy to post some pics when I finally get it.
AMG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 3, 2005, 4:56 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2
Default

I picked up a Digital Rebel last summer after salivating over it for months. (what a mess!) While I was initially a bit concerned about the plastic body, it has proven to be a complete non-issue for me. White balance hasn't been a show-stopper either. Shooting soccer matches for fun, I'm just happy to get 1 in 5 shots in focus.

I'll never go back to film. Throwing out those 4 crummy shots (of of that five) has become standard practice. I still let folks see some of my mistakes, but only the interesting ones ... :-)
geekbooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 3, 2005, 5:46 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 2
Default

Same here. I was worried about the body as it looks cheap and also feels a little cheap. After using it for a few weeks (and dropping it twice this week) I can tell you it's a lot more sturdy than I first thought.

Great camera, and I'm enjoying the Sigma 70-300, the canon 50mm and the kit lens. All good fun (but be nice with the 50mm Canon lens )
ElDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 3, 2005, 11:46 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
aladyforty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 6,964
Default

Ive had my Drebel for almost eight months having upgraded from a Canon G3. The body is a non issue asI always carry the camera in a good camera bag, Ive purchased a 100-300 usm lens that gets more use the lens that came with the camera (mainly wildlife shots)which is ok but I will be upgrading the kit lensto a 28-135 usmor 28-105 usm lens as soon as money is available. I also purchased a polarizer and a set of close upfilters (which Ive yet to really get a lot of use out of because Ive not really made an effort to try them out much:roll. I love this camera so far but Im sure in time I will look at going for a 20D or whatever else is on the market at the time. My plan is to have a great set of EF lenses so Im only looking at getting camera body upgrades. I'd get the rebel for now, it's a great start to digital SLR:-)
aladyforty is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:26 AM.