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Old Jan 14, 2005, 7:13 PM   #1
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Hi,

I'm the new owner of a 20D, just got it yesterday. I did have the D70 but I wasn't overly happy with it so I took it back to the store and instead of coming out with another one I opted for a 20D instead :-)

Both camera's are good in their own rights but I must admit that I'm really impressed with the ease of operation of the 20D, it's photo quality, plus it's got a few additional features as well. I must have reeled off (hic) over 700 pics already as I got use to and tried out the various buttons and modes etc

I've got a Sigma 70mm - 200mm F2.8 EX APO HSM lens on order, it should be with me in about a week but until then I have the use of a loanedTamron 28 - 300 XR Di lens which incidently I also had on the D70. As the aperture on this lens is F3.5 - F6.3, when I'm out on full zoom the resulting photos are somewhat dark though which as I've learnt as I've been reading lots of posts is fairly understandable for a F6.3 lens hence having the SigmaF2.8lens on order.

My question is .... Is there a 'rule of thumb formula' that I should use when I go out on the zoom setting to compensate for the resulting darker photos ? I appreciate that the ISO setting and shutter speed would also play a part in this. I know that I can adjust the EV but rather than trial and error as I'm taking some formal Sports photos tomorrow and I want to be able to get them right I thought that I'd ask and see what people say.

When viewing the photos on the camera monitor they look fine, you can't really tell that they are 'darkish', it's only when I open them up in PSP8 that I then see this. I know that I could do some post processing work on them but as part of my 'learning curve' I thought that I'd ask the question and see if there was anything unique to the20D that I can do or maybe something more generic other than just trial and error experimenting with different zoom ranges, ISO settings, shutter speed, aperture settings and EV adjustments until I find what I think is the best setting for each focal length. Thislast statement may well be the answer to my question

Cheers,

Brian
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Old Jan 14, 2005, 7:53 PM   #2
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Hi,

Don't go by the lcd screen on the camera ... rely on the histogram instead.



Bob
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 2:02 AM   #3
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It all depends on what you want to create. For example ...If one is in the rain forest ...which means very little sun getting through the trees
except for steaks of light. And you want to capture that effect of a ray of sun hiting the curly cues of an old banyan tree...well your camera will say I need more light and the histogram will concur ...but thats not what you want ......so it's up to YOU. Are you going to follow
the guide lines of what the camera tells you to do or are you going to take control.
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 5:18 AM   #4
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Very true, control is the key, the camera should be mere putty in my hands

I suppose in truth that's why I've fired off over 700 shots already as I exceperiment with what I like to see (and how) I like to see my photos look. Like I mentioned in my post I was just looking for any rule of thumb in this subject, however I agree with what you say in that's it's upto me to 'create' and 'capture' the photo that I want to see.

Is there any good sites that explain more about the intricacies of deciphering historgrams or is it all fairly simple (when you know how).

Thanks for the comments.

Brian
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 5:55 AM   #5
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Try this site. All types of articles onexposure and what not.

http://http://www.earthboundlight.com/phototip-archives.html]http://www.earthboundlight.com/phototip-archives.html]http://http://www.earthboundlight.com/phototip-archives.html[/url]
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Old Jan 16, 2005, 12:53 AM   #6
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I always shoot in RAW format and import into Photoshop Elements 3.

At the import stage you get quite a lot of control over how you want to expose the shot. By default on digital it's safer to underexpose slightly than to overexpose because there is lots of detail in the underexposed photo that is easy to push but if you blow a highlight area you can never get the detail back. Different manufacturers set their default exposure & ISO rating slightly differently. I have a vague recollection that a given ISO setting Canon images are 1/2 stop less exposed than Nikon - so coming from a D70 that might explain why some shots are looking a bit dark to you.

You might also find that you've changed the setting on your default exposure - check the lcd screen. I've accidentally managed to do this a couple of times, once by 1/3 stop and once by 2/3 stop. So everything was underexposed! The first time I managed to find how to switch it back in the menu, but the second I couldn't and had to reset to camera defaults.

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Old Jan 16, 2005, 3:37 PM   #7
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Many thanks for all of the comments & suggestions.

Brian
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