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Old Jan 15, 2005, 1:51 PM   #1
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As a newcomer to the world of Digital, I have been pleased with the images I have captured on camera. I have been shooting in sRGB mode and have been quite pleased with the quality of prints obtained on my Canon i965. However, although the camera manual advises owners who 'do not know about image processing '(me!)not to use the RGb Colour space, I wonder whether prints would look even better. Any advice please (Not too complicated!)
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 3:21 PM   #2
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For color space the 20D has 2 options, srgb and adobe rgb. Adobe rgb has alarger color space but you need an editing program that understands it, and as the book mentions you will probably need to do some work on the images to get them to look their best.
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Old Jan 15, 2005, 4:59 PM   #3
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Thanks. I have PS Elements. Presumably that would do but at the end of the day are the improvements going to be significant?
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Old Jan 16, 2005, 9:16 AM   #4
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You are entering the complicated world of Color Management. There are whole books on this subject. Do a search in Google on 'Color Management'and 'ICC profiles'. You might find this link usful:

http://www.normankoren.com/color_management_2.html

Shotting ina larger color space (aka gamut), such asAdobe RGD compared to Standard RGB does not necessarily prodcue better prints, but it may.

Goodluck and happy reading!




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Old Jan 16, 2005, 11:27 AM   #5
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I'll tend to agree, start out working with the sRGB, and when you start gettingmore into producing better final prints and more used to how things work in the programs then try to switch to adobe rgb.

You also need a pretty decent and calibrated monitor, video card and calibrated/profiled printer to be able to see the differences.

IMHO: Best thing now is to take the default sRGB and go out and learn to shoot well. When your output starts to annoy you and you feel it should look better it may be time to switch to adobe rgb, RAW files and all the extra work that goes with using them.

Peter.
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Old Jan 16, 2005, 11:31 AM   #6
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what would be the point of starting out with a smaller colorspace then converting to adobe rgb, you end up losing the shades of colors in between that the wider gamut would have supported. Not a big deal for screen but certainly for print.

Course it also depends on which printier you print out to, and how many visible shades of color the image started out with.
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Old Jan 16, 2005, 12:00 PM   #7
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There is no point to start out with sRGB and convert later.

If you are commenting on my previous post, I meant the original poster start out now using the camera defaults which include sRGB, and when they get proficient with the camera switchthe camerasoutput to adobe rgb, and go from there.
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Old Jan 17, 2005, 5:49 AM   #8
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Thanks for your help, guys. I guess I will stick with the sRGB colour space for a while as the results I'm getting are pretty good.
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Old Jan 18, 2005, 12:31 PM   #9
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Another thing to remember is what our intended use of the picture is. If its prints, Adobe RGB could be good (assuming your printer is good enough to take advantage of it.) If you post images to the web or send them to people on CD then you won't benefit from Adobe rgb... and it might even hurt you. You should covert back to sRGB before you post it and that will cost you some contrast. So you'll have to edit the picture again to get that contrast back.

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Old Jan 19, 2005, 1:20 AM   #10
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PeterP wrote:
Quote:
I'll tend to agree, start out working with the sRGB, and when you start getting*more into producing better final prints and more used to how things work in the programs then try to switch to adobe rgb.*

You also need a pretty decent and calibrated monitor, video card and calibrated/profiled printer to be able to see the differences.

IMHO: Best thing now is to take the default sRGB and go out and learn to shoot well. When your output starts to annoy you and you feel it should look better it may be time to switch to adobe rgb, RAW files and all the extra work that goes with using them.

Peter.
Peter P.
Your " IMHO " are very,VERY.wise words.
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