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Old Feb 1, 2005, 8:42 AM   #1
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I going to the aviary to get some shots of birds with my grandkids this morning and I'm looking for a quick answer on this. The rule on shutter speed do I use the numbers on the lens or do I convert it first. Zoom in to 50mm-use 1/50th shutter speed or faster Zoom in to 80mm-use shutter speed of 1/80th or faster Or should I multiply the 50 and or the 80mm by 1.6 and then use 1/that sum or faster shutter speed. The80mm becomes a 128mm so at 128mm-use 1/128th or faster shutter speed for hand held :-D Thanks
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Old Feb 1, 2005, 9:39 AM   #2
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Quick Answer..... Multiply by 1.6 so a 50mmm should be shot at 1/80th.

Richie
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Old Feb 1, 2005, 9:56 AM   #3
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Hey thanks on my way now :-D
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Old Feb 2, 2005, 8:38 PM   #4
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I realy like this shot, right out of the camera, only croped it used ef 50mm/f2.4
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 12:53 PM   #5
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The general rule of thumb for birds is you want the highest shutter speed possible without too much noise and enough DOF.

Fo if you were shooting with the 50mm and you could use these settings (just pulled out of my head for fun):
1/500 f2.8 ISO100

I would suggest you shoot at 1/250 f5.6 ISO200 (ISO200 on the 20D is so good the difference is almost non-existant to ISO100.)

That would give you good enough shutter speed with the 50mm and a large enough DOF that you will get the entire owl.

nice owl, BTW. That one is a bit young, but getting there. I've seen them in the wild before, lovely birds.

Eric
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 4:18 PM   #6
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Thanks for the adviceEric,I'll try working with those #'s next time
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Old Feb 3, 2005, 7:00 PM   #7
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Those numbers are not necessarily "right" for your situation. They are just an example. You can't just use canned numbers and expect to get a good shot. You have to learn what it all means and what effect it will have.

If you increase the fstop, you'll get more depth of field (more in focus) but less light (a slower shutter speed.) Since birds have lots of feather detail, you want them to be very sharp, which usually wants more shutter speed than normal. So you have to trade off more in focus for less shutter speed. And it's up to you to find that balance.

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Old Feb 3, 2005, 11:01 PM   #8
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I'll mention the dreaded tripod word here, holds the camera steady at low shutter speeds.

But places like aviary's don't generally allow them all the time. Some aviary's and butterfly conservatories occasionally have off-hour openings for photographers only where they do allow their use.

Peter.
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 7:54 AM   #9
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eric s wrote:
Quote:
Since birds have lots of feather detail, you want them to be very sharp, which usually wants more shutter speed than normal. So you have to trade off more in focus for less shutter speed. And it's up to you to find that balance.

Eric
Eric, Not completely sure I understand. Are you saying you need faster shutter speeds to get sharpness in the feathers? I don't shoot birds much at all, but I like to file away tidbits for when the opportunity arrises.
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 9:00 AM   #10
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So just to go back to the original question.

I understand the general rule of thumb that says when you are using a long focal length lens you use a shutter-speed equivalent to 1/focal length. So a 300mm focal length would require a shutter speed of at least 1/300 to prevent blurring caused by handholding the camera.

But how does this rule apply to digital cameras? Does it stay the same or do you have to take the 1.6x Crop Factor into account? Does the 1/300 shutter speed need to become 1/500 to prevent blurring now?




PS; Beautiful shot of the bird. If you are going back there again the only suggestion I could think of making is to use a wider aperture to blur the background behind the subject.
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