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Old Feb 9, 2005, 9:20 PM   #1
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This isn't really a which camera to buy so I hope this is the right place for this post.

I have the Digital Rebel. I really enjoy this camera. I guess my only two complaints are that it seems to underexpose a lot of my interior shots. Also when I am taking a series of photos to stitch together there are a lot of times that it just will not focus. You press down the button and you hear the lense trying to focus but it never does. And now my batteries are not fully charging. I am considering returning it for another 300D or move up to the 20D.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Anyway, my question is how much of an improvement would the 20D be over the 300D? I have read several reviews and customers comments on the 20D. It seems to have a better autofocusing system and better low light performance. I would like some opinions on whether it would be worth moving up to the 20D.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"On another note, as I saidneed to return the 300D and the difference in price to move up to the 20D would be $450 and the price of a lense(although I have an old Canon 35-80mm EF lense that I bought for my Canon Elan many years ago). Also I am assuming thatthe bounce flash that I bought for the Rebel would work with the 20D as well. I still will use the camera in auto mode (if the lighting is correct) most of the time, but I do love the fact that I can also use the manual settings when I need to or want to get creative. What do you think?

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Thanks

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Old Feb 9, 2005, 11:42 PM   #2
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There are two sides of this answer. One is about you, the other is about what you shoot.

You don't really say what you photograph, so I can only guess. You mention interiors. Other than the lower light AF ability, it won't really make any difference. Well, that isn't completley true, I guess, because you will have more control over the metering mode in the 20D.

There are many differences between the 20D and the 300D, but most of them are small. It's a question of your skill level and desire to learn.

Do you care that you don't have easy exposure compensation on the 300D? I love it and use it often.
Do you care that you can't easily pick the metering mode on the 300D? I rarely do this, but I have used it.
Do you care that you can shot much longer bursts of pictures? It sounds like you don't. I live by this.
Do you care that its smaller and lighter? I like this, but it was a bonus, not a requirement.

And there are other differences. You really have to think about what you photograph, how you work when you do it, and if the 20D will let you do it better.

For me, if I had the 300D, the 20D would be light years ahead. But that is because I shoot wild animal and better AF and faster shooting is just what I want.

As for the lens, yes, any lens that works on the 300D will also work on the 20D.

Eric
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 3:13 PM   #3
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Thank you eric s for answering. I didn't think about it but I guess I didn't leave enough information to help. Sorry.

My main purpose for buying the SLR camera is to take interior shots of homes. I thought this would be a fairly straight forward thing but I have to compensate for the lightening quite often. So I need something that I can adjust lighting. Then there is the focasing problem. I will be taking a series of photos to stitch together and there are a lot of times that it just will not focus and I have to move the camera until it will focus. Which then makes it hard or impossible for me to stitch it together because they don't line up. I had heard the 20D has a new autofocusing system and wondered if this might help or possibly illiminate this problem.

Also I do use it to take on vacation so I am taking scenery with it. Also I do take a lot of photos of friends and family at events and such. My company asks me to take photos at different sporting and company events. Sometimes it takes awhile for the camera to take a photo and if it is something that is a quick action, sometimes I miss it.

My other hobby is that I love to take night scenes of cities and buildings. I will say that I am a novice. I use to use the Canon Elan and was fairly knowledgable about photography but I will honestly say I have forgotten a lot and there are so many advancements that much of it doesn't apply. So therefore I am trying torefresh my memory and tolearn the new things. Therefore I do use auto most of the time but would like to be able to do creative things as I learn.

I hope this isn't too detailed but enough to help. I just don't know if it is necessary to upgrade or not.If it would help then Ithink it will be well worth the difference in price.

Thanks again for listening and for helping.

Nancy
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 4:15 PM   #4
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It sounds to me like your focusing problems are due to the lens more than the camera. If your lens is not "fast" enough, it will have a problem focusing in low light situations. That may, but is not guaranteed, to improve if you get the 20D. Your lens may also not be focusing because you're closer than the minimum distance (if you're using a particularly long lens). All of these problems are related more to the lens than the camera.
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 5:05 PM   #5
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That was not too much information at all. Very helpful.

I had the same though that perdendosi had. You might have been too close to the subject. You should look up what the minimum focusing distance is for the lens you used. And a lower fstop lens will help focus in lower light.

Some of the people that I know that do interior photo work have multiple flashes that they sync wirelessly. You can get small flash stands/tripods that let you position the flashes around the room for better lighting.

The 20D would help you some. It won't do much for interior work. Sure, the lower light focusing won't hurt, but is it worth the extra money? Probably not.

The camera will help with the vacation shots some, just by virtue of its higher MP. This means (with good lenses) that it will capture more detail than your DRebel.

It will definitely help with the company events. The better AF will get you shots you would have missed due to slow focusing.

I don't believe the 20D will be any better for night time photography, but I don't really know. It does generally have less noise than the DRebel, but does that include long exposures? I don't know. Most of what you learned with your Elan will apply to the 20D.

I'm not sure that it is worth the money on the surface. But you shound like an advanced enough photography that you'd grow into it easily where as the DRebel will start to limit you and get in the way. For that reason, it might be worth it.

Eric
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Old Feb 13, 2005, 3:38 AM   #6
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I wouldn't really worry too much about the upgrade. These forums are extremely interesting and helpful but focus too much on equipment. A huge number of very knowledgeable people spend a lot of time contributing but for me there is one rule above all else. A better camera doesn't make you a better photographer. Lots of technical arguments can be thrown around about this function for this purpose and that lens for that situation but at the end of the day all canon SLR's will take superb pictures. There are some that get hung up on almost unnoticable detail. If they want to do that, then nobody will be able to stop them. Just get out there and take as many pictures as you can. Dont worry abouta newcamera solving your problems, learn to use the 300D and take some amazing pictures. Any really decent photographer could manage with a 300D and the cheaper range of Eos lenses and still produce amazing shots. If you are not a pro then dont be tempted by the hype. Hope this helps. Enjoy your photography.
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Old Feb 13, 2005, 12:43 PM   #7
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Thanks Dinmore for your comments. I think you are right that a lot of the problem is my level of knowledge. I haven't really been a shutterbug for approximately 7-8 years. Since then I have forgotten a lot that I knew and I know there are many advances since then that I have to learn.

I did go look at the D20 yesterday and was surprised at how heavy it was. I know it is better constructed just was surprised. Also I didn't get to play with it much in the store but it looks to be a little more advanced than I need right now. I think I am going to take my rebel and play with it and also take a class to learn how to use it. Then I will decide on what to do.

Oh I did want to correct myself that Costco as their "bonus" has added the 18-55mm lense with the D20. I believe it is the same lense they put on the rebel. So it would only be $449 difference in price. That makes it much more tempting.

Thanks everyone for your comments, it has really helped to make me a much more informed buyer. I really appreciate it.

Oh one more note. You guys mentioned the focusing problem could be that I'm too close to the subject. I am at minimum 8 feet away. Most rooms are at least 8 feet wide. I stand as close to the opposite wall as possible to take the photo. Most rooms are more than 8 feet. So I don't think that is the problem. Which leads to my next question. You mentioned that a good lens may be faster and help with the focusing. Is the lense that comes with the Rebel a decent lense? I'm sure there are much better quality out there but is the Rebel's adecent one? If not I might consider buying another lense. I don't mind at all if it would help. It would save me money and time than having to fix a lot of the photos in Photoshop. That is very time consuming.

Thanks again.


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Old Feb 15, 2005, 8:48 AM   #8
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For stitching together panorama shots it only makes sense to use manual focus and manual exposure (i.e. same for all the shots). Don't use autofocus or automatic exposure modes for stitching together.

How do you know your "batteries" (plural?) aren't fully charging? There is only one in the Rebel, not counting the coin sized one that doesn't recharge.

Did you consider posting some of the "underexposed" interior shots? Did you think it might be easier for us to help you if you showed us what they look like? You worried about posting too much detail, but you didn't tell us if you used flash or not, or what the setting and modes were like. Try starting with that kind of detail. More detail, more help.


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