Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 5, 2005, 4:29 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Quan Tran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 277
Default

Hi everyone,

I have bought a Canon Digital Rebel 300D for two weeks but so far what I can do with the camera is the Basic Zone (automatic modes). I know that a good photo can be rarely taken with the auto mode. Does anyoneknow anything URLor web sites that teach how to master this camera please advise. I think the instructions in the manualare inadequate.

Thanks a lot for your help.

Regards,

Quan


Quan Tran is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 5, 2005, 4:38 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
VictorEM83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 156
Default

dont get overwhelmed, it is rather easy to use. The thing is you have to get the basics down, my first 2 months with the DRebel I sucked in Manual Mode. So I kept up on reading on each of the main controls factors to get a good exposure.The really key things are ISO, apeture (aka the F number), and shutter speed.

Once you understand each part of the process of getting a good exposure and the role they play then you will be able to apply it and get good photos.
VictorEM83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 5:11 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Quan Tran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 277
Default

Hello Victor,

Thanks a lot for your advice on this. I am sure it will take memore time to learn the manual settings. You know, I bought the Canon Powershot S500 last year and it took me months to get used to the manual settings. Now came this little dslr Rebel. :-)

Regards,

Quan


Quan Tran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 8:02 AM   #4
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

The best advice is to go to your local library and get a book on photography and exposure. M, Tv, Av modes, meteringand ISO speedshave been around a lot longer than digital cameras. Their application in digital is no different than it is in film (with the exception that you can change your ISO speed on the camera after every shot if you like rather than changing a roll of film). It's a cheaper alternative than spending $50 on a digital photography book. Once you have a grasp on those things, then you can concentrate on the differences with digital (white balance, using the histogram, etc.).
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 8:33 AM   #5
Super Moderator
 
Hards80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 9,046
Default

you can also check out the web... maybe do a search for introductory photography lessons.. or online beginner photography lessons... there should be a number of articles and possibly an interactive demo or two.. just keep playing with your search strings and you should be able to get a good start...

but i agree with johng, the library will also be a great resource...

enjoy, dustin
Hards80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 9:07 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 301
Default

The following isn't a replacement for a good book or a short course on basic phtography, but it will help you learn the basics:

http://www.camerasinteractive.com/index.php

Also, Kodak has some very good learning information on their site:

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQueri...q-locale=en_US



Have fun!



Bob
BobA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 9:42 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 74
Default

As Victor EM83 noted, you seem overwhelmed. I will tell you that for average shots, my 300D selects the very sameshutter speeds and f-stops inan Auto mode thatI would select in Manual mode if the ISO setting is the same. Auto modes use ISO 100. I usuallyset ISO 200 in Manual mode so I can use ahigher shutter speed. Unless a particular shot requires a fast shutter speed to stop action or a large stop (f16) tomaximize depth of field, youwon'tsee a bigdifferenceusing the Manual mode. The big differences comefrom selectively metering highlights or shadows to emphasize certain areas of the scene,manually focussing to make areas stand out, etc. That ability comes slowly with practice. One great thing about digital is you cantry thingsall day and just erase shots you don't like. Check out the Canon Digital Learning web site for good tips. Then just take your time, experiment and have fun.
ADSchiller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 10:20 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Quan Tran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 277
Default

Hello,

Thanks all of you very much for your kind advice. Bob, I've played around with http://www.camerasinteractive.com/index.php. It is very interesting and easy to understand the fundamentals of photography. I don't know why spending a lot of time on the net but could find this good tutorial until you let me know.

Another question: I now have a Canon Digital Rebel with the kit lens 18 - 55 mm. My hobby is to take macro shots, travel shots, landscape shots, night shots, action shots, animal shots. Do I have to buy any more lenses economically and any other necessary accessories? Near my work place is the heliport,helicopters flying acrossmy head every day. All I want is a good shot of the chopper with the blade frozen in the sky. How could I set the shutter speed, aperture value and ISO. Please advise.:?

Regards,

Quan


Quan Tran is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 11:29 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
RyanH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 452
Default

I have also heard these are good books.

http://www.shortcourses.com/bookstor...canonrebel.htm

--------
Ryan
RyanH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 5, 2005, 11:53 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 301
Default

Hi Quon,

To cover all of the different types of shots you would like to take you will probably need a few different lenses. However, I would really recommend taking some time to really learn how to use your camera with the lens that you currently have before making a decision on a lens purchase. The 18-55 is a good, inexpensive general purpose lens which is capable of taking nice images. Sure, it's not long enough for taking pictures of aircraft or animals from a distance, but it's just fine as a first lens to learn how to use an SLR.

Get a good book on the basics of photography, ask questions on forums and take lots of photos ... and soon you will really get comfortable with your camera and setting the proper exposure. I'd also recommend enrolling in a short course at you local community college if one is available.

When the day comes where you need to buy a different lens, really do a lot of research. There are some lens review sites such as http://www.photodo.com/nav/prodindex.htmland http://www.photozone.de/1Home/that are helpful (I personally like photozone.de), and lots of us that are always willing to give you a friendly opinion :-) My only caution is that when you ask for an opinion about a lens purchase on a forum you will certainly get a variety of answers, and sometimes a bit of debate ...

Enjoy your new camera!



Bob
BobA is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:48 PM.