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Old Apr 6, 2005, 10:03 AM   #1
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I finally ordered my 20D, lenses and accessories and suspect one of the first items I'm going to want to add to my arsonal is a circular polarizer as Oregon has a lot of water and blue sky. I'll want a 77mm so as to fit on the 17-40 and the 70-200. I suspect the "you get what you pay for" saying is true for this type of filter, so I am wondering if anyone has first-hand experience with specific brands/models or can point me to side-by-side comparisons somewhere.

Thanks!
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Old Apr 6, 2005, 10:47 AM   #2
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check ebay...
i looked and there's a hoya 77mm for 35 bucks..
hoya is a big name..so it should be good...
i'm not sure if it's the 'wide angle' one though, those are usually more expensive..
for the 70-200 it wouldn't matter, but the 17-40 might cause vignetting with a wider filter...

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Old Apr 6, 2005, 11:02 AM   #3
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I know that with a 17mm you want a thin filter. Especially if you are like me and keep a UV filter on to protect the lens. I bought a few filters in my day that showed up in the photos b/c it was too thick. However, that was 35mm anf this is Digital. So that might not be a problem.

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Old Apr 6, 2005, 11:53 AM   #4
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Thanks for the responses.
What I really want it first-hand experience with specific brands/models, or a web site that shows side-by-side comparisons of various polarizers. I understand I need a "thin" filter if I intend to use it for wide angle shots. I also understand that "thin", "circular"and "multicoated" increase the cost. I'm not really interested in where to get the best deal. I'm more interested in the best quality/dollar ratio.

Thanks again,
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Old Apr 6, 2005, 12:16 PM   #5
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Thin is a general rule for wide angle, but with the 'crop factor' of the 20d, vignetting is not an issue with a reliable filter. Multicoating will increase the ability to cut down on lense flare and will also increase the amount of light that gets through (which may be the difference of another stop compared to a non-multi coated filter). I personally use the Hoya SHMC Pro 1 filter - about $180 from 2filter.com(the filter connection) for a 77mm mount for my 17-40 and 70-200 lenses. While the ultra thin is not necessary for the 17-40 on the 20d I wanted it anyway in case down the road I have a full size sensor or I get a wider lense where vignetting could occur. The only real downside to the ultra thin (as opposed to the HMC I use for my 28-135) is it's thinness makes it trickier to rotate - it takes a more delicate touch.

I know B+W has a very highly regarded multi-coated CP but if memory serves it was a bit more than the Hoya and my research of people's opinions showed Hoya users were equally happy with them.
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Old Apr 6, 2005, 12:41 PM   #6
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JohnG wrote:
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Thin is a general rule for wide angle, but with the 'crop factor' of the 20d, vignetting is not an issue with a reliable filter.* Multicoating will increase the ability to cut down on lense flare and will also increase the amount of light that gets through (which may be the difference of another stop compared to a non-multi coated filter).* I personally use the Hoya SHMC Pro 1 filter - about $180 from 2filter.com*(the filter connection) for a 77mm mount for my 17-40 and 70-200 lenses.* While the ultra thin is not necessary for the 17-40 on the 20d I wanted it anyway in case down the road I have a full size sensor or I get a wider lense where vignetting could occur.* The only real downside to the ultra thin (as opposed to the HMC I use for my 28-135) is it's thinness makes it trickier to rotate - it takes a more delicate touch.

I know B+W has a very highly regarded multi-coated CP but if memory serves it was a bit more than the Hoya and my research of people's opinions showed Hoya users were equally happy with them.*
Excellent!
This is the type of info I am looking for. Anyone else?
I'm still interested in quality comparisons...

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Old Apr 6, 2005, 1:02 PM   #7
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i have also had good luck with Hoya's HMC series.. its a little less expensive than the SHMC Pro 1 but still retains a 97% light transmission versus the 99.something% of the SHMC.. i have them in several sizes and in several variations including circ-polorizers.. and i have never been disappointed.. and if you are planning on stickin with cameras with a 1.6x crop factor, you will not need to go with ultra-thin model..
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Old Apr 6, 2005, 1:40 PM   #8
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Remember your shooting with some of the best glass money can buy there, IMHO I would go ultra high end because you only have to buy 1 filter and if you get the 24-70 F2.8L it will work on that too! It is wise to buy once and dont look back rather than buy twices and spend more money.
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Old Apr 6, 2005, 2:51 PM   #9
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VictorEM83 wrote:
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Remember your shooting with some of the best glass money can buy there, IMHO I would go ultra high end because you only have to buy 1 filter and if you get the 24-70 F2.8L it will work on that too! It is wise to buy once and dont look back rather than buy twices and spend more money.
Thanks again,

I am looking for best quality, but highest cost does not always equal best quality. Canon make quality product, but some of their lenses stink. In some cases I could buy a 3rd-party lens for much less and still get better quality. This is why I am asking for personal experience or comparisons. I don't want to just buy the highest priced filter and assume it must be the best because of it.

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Old Apr 6, 2005, 4:19 PM   #10
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The question you have to really ask is, now that I have spent over $2000 on lenes should I cheap them down? If the answer is yes buy a $50-75 generic filter, if its no spring the extra $100-$150

Here are the top brands that you wont have to worry about
Heliopan, Leica, B+W, and Hoya
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