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Old Apr 22, 2005, 8:09 PM   #1
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Is it a good idea to have a UV filter put on all my lens at all times. Should the UV filter be on for indoors and outdoors all the time when taken photos? Canon SLR Rebel 6.3mp.
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Old Apr 22, 2005, 10:21 PM   #2
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Imacer wrote:
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Is it a good idea to have a UV filter put on all my lens at all times. Should the UV filter be on for indoors and outdoors all the time when taken photos? Canon SLR Rebel 6.3mp.
I have three lenses. I have a UV filter on all 3 to protect them. I always keep the UV filters on my lenses whether I'm shooting indoors or outdoors. One time my camera case fell out of the back of my SUV. The UV filter was shattered, but my lense glass was not. I believe the UV filter protected my lens.
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Old Apr 23, 2005, 1:08 PM   #3
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Your going to get the bestperformance from any lens without another reflective glass surface in front of it. Expensive lenses are reduced to the quality of the glass you put in front of them. I don't and have never used uv's on my lenses and I"ve been a professional photographer for over thirty years. I'venever had a problem. The only exception would be if you are shooting in a hostile environment where lens protection makes more sense i.e sand, wind, water. I would not put a $30 or$40piece of glass in front of a 6 or 7 hundred dollar lens.

tony


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Old Apr 23, 2005, 1:14 PM   #4
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though i also use the UV filter and very good ones too, a word of warning. when shooting into a light especially a point source light at an angle be aware that no matter how goodthe coatings on your filter are you do run the risk of flair it may be minor but it may endup in an objectionable location in the image do not be afraid to remove the filter and shoot without it if necessary.

for me my life is shooting mostly in such 'hostile" environments. so i deal with it as necessay. but only for 28 years so far.


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Old Apr 23, 2005, 10:04 PM   #5
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tmumolo wrote:
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Your going to get the best performance from any lens without another reflective glass surface in front of it. Expensive lenses are reduced to the quality of the glass you put in front of them. I don't and have never used uv's on my lenses and I"ve been a professional photographer for over thirty years. I've never had a problem. The only exception would be if you are shooting in a hostile environment where lens protection makes more sense i.e sand, wind, water. I would not put a $30 or $40 piece of glass in front of a 6 or 7 hundred dollar lens.

tony

Interesting. I've never thought about it that way.
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Old Apr 23, 2005, 10:10 PM   #6
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i think about it this way.. i'll do whatever i can to protect my 600-700 dollar lens.. so this is what i have been doing... i keep uv's or skylights on my lenses at all times.. but like others have mentioned, it can cause problems with lens flare.. so if i experience this problem, i just take it off for the shoot.. and then i simply put it back on when i am finished..
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Old Apr 23, 2005, 11:16 PM   #7
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For night shots I don't suggest a UV or any other filter, because it can have a weird effect on the photo. Other then that, I use a UV almost all the time. I would definitely go with the most expensive filter you can afford because like others have said they can degrade the quality of your pictures. Also go with a brand like Hoya or B+W. UV's not only cut haze but have also saved many lenses from becoming damaged.
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Old Apr 24, 2005, 8:33 PM   #8
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I never use a filter under any situation.

I'd rather make changes with software later.

I don't use a filter to protect a lens, and neither do my pro photog friends.

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Old Apr 24, 2005, 9:49 PM   #9
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I use a UV almost all the time, but like sjms said, they can cause unwanted flair. I do know one pro photographer who (like terry said) never uses UV filters, and has not used them in his 50 years of photography. I do however think its a good idea to have a filter on the lens pretty much all the time - but if your going to do that, get a good filter (like people have already stated here) because your lens is only as good as the filter. . .
crappy filter = crappy image quality:lol:
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Old Apr 24, 2005, 11:22 PM   #10
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I both do and don't use UV/1A filters as the situation demands.

By far the filters I most often use area polarizer or a split ND. If you are worried about protecting the lens any of the filters will do the job, and it is best to not stack them if at all possible.

Peter.
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