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Old Apr 25, 2005, 11:33 PM   #1
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I was trying to take pics of the moon and none where really coming out that great i have an rebel xt what would be a good setting for taking pics of the moon.
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Old Apr 25, 2005, 11:54 PM   #2
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Try one slow exposure to get the night sky and one fast exposure to get the moons detail then overlay the two. It's quite a nice effect, I haven't got my FTP software setup otherwise I'd show you one I did with the 300D. You'll probably find some if you do a search.

cheers

Mart.
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Old Apr 26, 2005, 1:26 AM   #3
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What lens do you have? You may need at 300mm + to get decent detail. The following may also help:

http://www.calphoto.com/moon.htm

http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/moon/


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Old Apr 27, 2005, 5:59 AM   #4
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Hi



As you asked for settings, here they are:

1/250 sec at f5.6 or f8.0 at ISO 100

As you puzzle at the apparent high speed, remember the moon is reflecting sunlight (it has no light of its own) so the shutter/aperture setting is what one would use for sunlight. Longer exposures cause a few problems: Firstly, as the earth and moon are moving relative to each other, you will get a blurred shot due to movement. Next, detail on the face of the moon is lost with long shutter speedsin theimage area of the moon due to over-exposure.

Use a tripod, zoom in as close as you can and use the settings given. Then use your software to pull in the shot some more. You will be amazed at the result.


Then of course, you can play with layers as discussed in another reply.

Have fun

Fuzz-Face
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Old Apr 28, 2005, 2:23 PM   #5
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mf_blues can you explaint to me the settings, I try to take a moon shoots and only I get a bright spot shaking, I use 28-300mm lens, and I use the camera in night shoot (automatic). is you thisk is better setting can you tell me?:?
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Old Apr 28, 2005, 5:39 PM   #6
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Just put the camera in aperture priority mode, and set it to f/5.6 or f/8 (whatever you want) then just spotmeter off the moon. . .
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Old Apr 28, 2005, 10:41 PM   #7
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AMATHEU wrote:
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mf_blues can you explaint to me the settings, I try to take a moon shoots and only I get a bright spot shaking, I use 28-300mm lens, and I use the camera in night shoot (automatic). is you thisk is better setting can you tell me?:?

You can't shoot the moon using the light meter in the camera unless you want to see a bright white ball with no detail. The moon only takes up a portion of the scene against a black sky ... and the camera would want to make the picture an average of 18% grey. In other words, your picture will be very overexposed.

Note that mf_blues provided a cool method to get both the sky and the moon exposure right. If this is a bit advanced and you just want a good picture of the moon, think of what you would have to set your camera at to get a good picture if you were at the beach on a sunny day. It's ALWAYS a sunny day on the moon.

This is why you need to shoot in manual. For a first try go with Iso 100, f16 and 1/125s, or try the settings that Fuzz-Face gave.



Bob
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 2:14 AM   #8
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BobA wrote:
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You can't shoot the moon using the light meter in the camera unless you want to see a bright white ball with no detail. The moon only takes up a portion of the scene against a black sky ... and the camera would want to make the picture an average of 18% grey.
If the XT doesn't have a spotmeter, you could put the camera in center weighted, and set the exposure comp to -2 or so.
You just have to try it and see what you can do.
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 9:20 AM   #9
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Hi KM-Krazy,

There have been tons of posts and may websites dedicated to how to shoot pictures of the moon properly. The types of settings that mf_blues, Fuzz-Face and i have suggested are consistent with all of them.

Any metering mode available on a 20D or XT wouldn't have a chance to work unless you had a very long lens so that the moon filled a major portion of the frame. Even then (i.e., with a 600mm to 1200mm lens), I don't think I would trust my light meter.

Bob
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Old Apr 30, 2005, 1:37 AM   #10
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The moon it lit by sunlight, and has the reflectance of your averagewhite hand (plus or minus any tanning).

Using an old standby that daylight in temperate zones is 1/ASA at f16, ISO 100 will require a 1/100 second exposure at f16.

Working for higher shutter speeds:

1/100 f16
1/200 f11
1/400 f8.0
1/800 f5.6
1/1500 f4.0







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