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Old Apr 29, 2005, 5:29 AM   #1
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Seems to me, my images are underexposed when I shoot themat the "0" point on the meter. Similarly, in auto function they seem under exposed. They look better at 1.2 to 1.5 above "0". Does anyone else have this experience?:?
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 1:30 PM   #2
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Yup - for me and I have heard ths from MANY others.
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 5:41 PM   #3
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is it not purposefully done by canon to prevent users from loosing information in blown-out hightlights, since its easier to pull detail from shadows.. i guess canon figures if you are spending 1500 bucks on a camera you can more than likely do a little post-processing..

but yea.. i frequently have to add about +.5 to +.75 in post process...
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 7:20 PM   #4
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Thank you for the replies..So you think my est at over "1" is excessive. ????
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Old Apr 30, 2005, 12:49 AM   #5
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It's called controlling the camera rather than the camera controlling you. Make sure you have the metering mode set correctly. Don't take photos with lots of sky and expect the foreground to be properly exposed. Don't take photos of lots of foreground and expect the sky to be properly exposed.

Also - did you read the manual - the part about bracketing?

I meter three or four spots in a composition before I click the shutter. A habit learned years ago from paying way too much for film.


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Old Apr 30, 2005, 1:13 AM   #6
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you can try metering on a grey card (Kodak, as well as other manufacturers, makes them), locking the exposure and taking the picture. See what you get, then try the same picture letting the camera meter on the specific situation and see what happen. My camera seems to be dead on. It is the flash where I have to increase the compensation to 2/3, but everyone here says that it is normal, so....c'est la vie!
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Old Apr 30, 2005, 7:46 AM   #7
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Nancy Gabby wrote:
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you can try metering on a grey card (Kodak, as well as other manufacturers, makes them), locking the exposure and taking the picture. See what you get, then try the same picture letting the camera meter on the specific situation and see what happen. My camera seems to be dead on. It is the flash where I have to increase the compensation to 2/3, but everyone here says that it is normal, so....c'est la vie!
Exactly - It's what all cameras are calibrated to, and not to the contents of your picture which may vary depending on low/high keys
ditto with flash - It's dead on with a grey card (you just have to FEL lock on it!)
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Old Apr 30, 2005, 6:33 PM   #8
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Does correcting levels and contrast in PS yield the same result as using a gray card? Or will the photo always be better if exposed correctly in camera?
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Old Apr 30, 2005, 8:44 PM   #9
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bigboyhf wrote:
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Does correcting levels and contrast in PS yield the same result as using a gray card?
No - This is similar to correcting badly exposed negatives through 'burning/dodging' in the darkroom

-> They may 'look' the same overall but you are loosing either the highlight or detail in the shadow, unless the 'digital' image is properly exposed first...
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Old May 1, 2005, 1:58 AM   #10
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One major problem with a gray card: if you are photographing the sky or a mountain in the distance, or something lit by sunlight that your card isn't in, the card will not be accurate.

For example, if you are in a valley,m in shade, and direct sun is hitting the mountain with snow, the 18% gray card will be very wrong. Same is true of the sky.

It really is best to meter the scene... then if in doubt, bracket. If you have a 20D or similar, use the highlight detect mode of the image preview & histogram. Expose 1/2 stop below blinking highlights and you've done as good as you can without filters in front of the lens (like split neutral density).
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