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Old May 10, 2005, 8:47 AM   #1
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:?I am at the point of replacing my digital rebel. I'meager to move up to something better? I want to stay with Canon. Does anyone haveany negative or positive experienceswith the Canon 20D?I can also afford a new lens (under $800) I will be using it for studio portraits.

Many thanks in advance.
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Old May 29, 2005, 4:16 PM   #2
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I can't believe there are no replies to this thread. Perhaps it should be moved to the DSLR page. I've had a 20D for about 3 months and like it a lot. I researched everywhere and nothing compared to it for the money, in any of the reviews. I bought the Canon EOS 28-135 IS lense with it and have gotten very nice results with it, macro, landscape, weddings, famly events...anything. I'm still learning it but a good friend (pro photographer)who owns 2 10D's borrowed mine for a few hours one afternoon and he REALLY liked the camera. There are so many good features, it's hard to beat and nearly in the samein many featuresas the much higher priced Canon DSLR's. I don't think you'll be sorry if you get one.
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Old May 29, 2005, 4:42 PM   #3
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The 20D is an excellent camera. It does have a few quirks like all the others, but overall is probably your best bet, especially if you are moving from the Rebel. I have the 17-85 IS lens and very happy with it, though there are some who have issues with sharpness. I just haven't seen it... The two problems that bother me most is that the ISO setting does not stay displayed on the lcd, so you can sometimes forget and do some shooting on an ISO that you didn't really want. The other is lack of "real" spot metering. Other than those and a slight underexposure of the flash metering, it is a super camera.

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Old May 29, 2005, 10:15 PM   #4
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I upgraded from the D-Reb to the 20D. It is definitely a much better camera than the D-Reb. Reason I upgraded was that my D-Reb went on the dreaded Err99 binge! I had the D-Reb fixed but it is now my backup. The 20D is faster at everything and the picture quality is fantastic. I loaned it to a friend for a short picture taking session and he is getting a 20D this week. He has beena long term Nikon supporter. I can't say I have any gripes other than it is taking a me a while to adjust to the menus. As I learn where all the selections are located I am getting better at quickly making changes. I also purchased two additional lenses for it, EF 70-200L and the EFS 60MM Macro. Sorry, I can't say I have any negatives on the camera. You'll be pleased with your purchase.
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Old May 29, 2005, 10:56 PM   #5
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You don't mention what you shoot (subjects.) This makes it very hard to recommend a camera.

To answer your question, I have the 20D and generally like it.

Pro:
Instant On is amazing. I can set the powerdown to something very short and I don't notice. Well, ok. I notice when I have left the camera idle for a bit and then try to play back a picture or two. But when shooting, the instant on really feels like its only an instant. Saves me loads of battery power, the hassle of changing, and I don't have to charge nearly as often (and risk forgetting it on the charger.)

In good light, the AF is better. But since I often shoot in outdoors I find the AF seems no better than the 10D most of the time. It hunts some times, just like the 10D. And that costs me shots. (Note I don't shoot with an f2.8 lens, I use the 600mm f4 90% of the time. So maybe that is better?)

I'm mixed on the extra AF points. I don't use them that often any ways. But when I do the extra ones are kinda handy.

Cons:
The AF points are smaller than on the 10D (and I bet the DRebel.) This makes tracking things in motion a bit harder. Sure, you'll get better with practice. It is just less forgiving and that will cost you shots. You have to be more careful and get better.

While having the ISO in the view finder would be great, I don't believe any Canon DSLR has that. I'd love it, but dinging the camera for that without pointing that out doesn't seem very fair.

I find the diopter seems easy to bump and turn when stashed in my camera backpack. Maybe it is how I pick it up, maybe it is that its easier to move it. Either way, I've started to always check it whenever I take it out the first time.

It's a good camera, and the higher resolution is nice. But unless we know how and what you shoot it is difficult to recommend it.

To me, the best feature you gain from the DRebel to the 10D or 20D is the extra wheel. Changing aperture and exposure compensation easily is a joy. Not having to "toggle" the meaning of the dial is great. But if you don't need this, then this bonus is lost on you and you'll get less for your money (why not upgrade to the TX? Yes, the 20D is better but why waste your money unless you know you'll need it.)

Eric
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Old May 30, 2005, 7:13 AM   #6
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Thanks for the reply(s) My photo interests are: studio fashionphotography and macro subjects. For the first time (this summer) I hope to participate in a hot air balloon photoshoot.

My current lens lineup consists of a 18-55, 75-300 and a macroEF 100mm. I use the macro lens formany of my portraits and the closeups are (in my humble opinion) just great. My studio is 23' deep by 19' wide with a 9' ceiling. I have a two lightAlien Bee lighting system. Although I enjoy the Drebel, I will be upgrading my camers this year - most likely to a 20D.

Follow up query - What Canon lens ($800 U.S.or less) is best suited for studio fashion shoots?

Many thanks.
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Old May 30, 2005, 7:50 AM   #7
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I'd recommend the Sigma 70-200 f2.8 EX if you dont want to get close the the subject or a 50mm f1.4 if you able to get right up close.

Ive used both, and own the 70-200, its very sharp and good value.

PM me if you want some portraits taken with it.
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Old May 30, 2005, 3:45 PM   #8
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All good points on the 20D vs the XT.Things not mentioned. The XT does not have a PC sync connection and the XT is very small. I did notlike the size of the XT. I tried both and the 20D is a much more substantial camera. May be a matter of taste but you may find yourself saying "I should'a" gone with the 20D. Still $400 difference is nothing to gloss over.
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