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Old Dec 23, 2002, 1:43 PM   #1
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Default What to Do About D60 Underexposure?

:? I know from the posts that the D60 has an underexposure problem. My seems to be off about 1 stop. I am trying to decide whether to send it in for adjustment or just compensate and live with it. I don't see any fixes on the Canon Web site, and I'm not seeing the point discussed in the posts.

Thank you for your opinions and experiences.
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Old Dec 23, 2002, 10:57 PM   #2
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I haven't personally noticed an underexposure problem with the D60, but consider this: You can correct for underexposure in software, but not overexposure. Once something is maxed out on color, the information is lost.

I would prefer underexposure if I wasn't absolutely positive that my selected exposure was correct.

I believe you can adjust the camera to compensate the exposure as desired... I don't think it makes sense to send the capera in if you want to do this... just do it yourself in the settings.

Judd
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Old Dec 31, 2002, 11:24 AM   #3
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I have observed the following exposure related problems with the D60Ö.

1) The LCD on the camera back displays an image that appears to be Ĺ to 1 stop brighter than the actual recorded image. I think the D60 needs an option to dim down the LCD to match the actual exposure

2) The TTL flash metering system in the D60 does not compensate well for challenging situations. I.E. If the subject is mostly black, it overexposes the image. Transversely, if the subject is mostly white, it underexposes the image. The results are virtually the same in any of the 3 metering modes. My theory on this is that Canon cut corners on the quality of the TTL metering system. It functions much like the early metering systems, before computerized compensations were invented.

3) The TTL flash metering system appears to be slightly more accurate with the built-in flash than with the 550EX. Iíve also noticed that the TTL/550EX combination tends to consistently create underexposed images, so I usually keep the 550EX set up with a +1/2 stop exposure compensation.

4) The TTL metering system works much better in available light and/or flash fill situations. The metering system really starts to struggle when the shooting scenes dark enough to require flash for the majority of the lighting.

These observations were all made from shooting situations where there was plenty of power in the strobe to properly light the subject, if the TTL had functioned properly. All photos were shot using the Canon EF 28-70mm f2.8 L series lens. The D60 was set to ISO 400, f4.0 @ 1/90 sec.

I would be most grateful for any advice on dealing with these problems. Because of them, I have concluded (at least for now) that the D60 does not offer a reliably accurate flash photography system. This is based on a comparison with the flash results from my EOS 1-N and EOS A2E camera systems, which both give outstanding flash exposure results.
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Old Dec 31, 2002, 2:06 PM   #4
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I have experienced the underexposure problem using the flash only. Although I can see why Canon would choose to bias metering down, I find it unacceptable to set it by default instead of offering it as a Custom Function. Exposure level is a function of the scene, not the camera! Does anybody have a solution besides the obvious manual exposure adjustment? TIA.
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Old Jan 17, 2003, 5:45 PM   #5
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It is well known that the D60 under exposes by default. The amount varies from lens to lens, the 28-135 IS being one of the worst. You can get a profile on the amount your camera under exposes with each of your lenses by shooting a well lit, featureless, blank wall of any solid color. Observe the histogram on the details on the LCD. You will see a single verticle band anywhere from 1/3 to 1 stop to the left of center.

Many believe that Canon built this in as a safety against blowing out highlights. As has been said it is easy to compensate in PS, or you can compensate by dialing in some in some extra exposure, but this will put you at risk of blowing bright shots.

Canon will find nothing wrong with your camera.
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Old Jan 19, 2003, 11:29 AM   #6
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I should note that in the above procedure, you should use manual focus since it may be impossible to obtain autofoucus this way.
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Old Feb 6, 2003, 6:15 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jspittler
I haven't personally noticed an underexposure problem with the D60, but consider this: You can correct for underexposure in software, but not overexposure. Once something is maxed out on color, the information is lost.

I would prefer underexposure if I wasn't absolutely positive that my selected exposure was correct.

I believe you can adjust the camera to compensate the exposure as desired... I don't think it makes sense to send the capera in if you want to do this... just do it yourself in the settings.

Judd
Compensating for one stop of under-exposure with curves/levels in PS is not practical.

Digital images have an exposure laqtitude that's close to slide film. About +/- 2 stops. Giving up 1 stop is very significant.

BTW, I have no problem with the D60 over-exposing or under-exposing, as long as I am mindful of the subject's tone. If you use partial metering or center-weighted metering (my preference is partial metering), you need to use exposure compensation or flash exposure compensation, if the subject is not a midtone.

With macro shots of flowers and the like, you often have to use exposure compensation or flash exposure compensation.

Also, realize in Av, Tv, and M modes, the flash only exposes the subject. In the other program modes, the flash exposes both the flash and the background. So you often need sepoarate settings for exposure compensation and flash exposure compensation when using flash in Av, Tv, and M modes. With a dark background, make sure you use a tripod, too. The shutter will open, the flash will pop, and there can be a long delay until the shutter closes.

Cheers,

Mitch
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