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Old May 17, 2005, 8:51 AM   #1
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Hi guys I´m almost there to buy a Canon DR XT...

There´s anything I need to know?

I´m upgrading my gear into the SRL world from my FujiFilm S5100.

I been reading many comments and threads.

And I found many good reviews on the camera

I like to use the camera for moving subjects and most candid actions shots.

I hate noise, hope this rebel "guy" :? fullfill my expectations.


Waiting for your expertise comments

Thanks
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Old May 17, 2005, 10:35 AM   #2
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there are many things to know .. but i will try to get you started..

get a couple good 1gb or greater flash cards... good ones i.e. lexar 80x professional, sandisk extreme III..

an extra battery can be helpful, but not necessary..

Learn Post-Processing - if you don't already know it.. dslr's images need some post processing, for example sharpening, for them to look good.. the program i like to use is photoshop elements 3.0, it is a quite powerful little program for a reasonable 99USD, and can do most of what CS can do, especially if you pick up a few plugins...

either of the kit lenses are a good start, after using it for a while you will have a better idea of what kind of lens you need next...

you need to learn about depth of field, etc.. so pick up a book or take a course at a local community college, camera club, etc...

idunno, its early in the morning, thats all i can think of for now, i am sure others will pick up the things i missed...

enjoy your digirebxt, dustin
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Old May 19, 2005, 3:06 PM   #3
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I just upgaded from my fuji s5000 to rebel xt and iI feel very glad, it was a great decision. But I recomend to buy only the body and buy a better lens.
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Old May 19, 2005, 3:30 PM   #4
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Hards80 has some good advice. Other things I will point out:

1. Read the manual several times - in fact, download it from Canon early and start reading it early. Then go over it again when you have the camera.

2. Repeat step 1

3. Do some research on-line and at the library to understand exposure and how ISO, aperture, shutter speed all combine to affect it. To get the most out of your new camera you're going to need to get out of automatic mode - and really out of the preset modes. To do that, you need to understand how these3 things combine to control proper exposure.

4. Along with exposure, do some research on depth-of-field (DOF). You will need to gain an understanding of how your DOF will change with your aperture setting. Here is an example - I was recently at my niece's confirmation (catholic church thing) - and without getting too technical I had the aperture set 'wide' (small f-stop) which allowed me to shoot in lower light situations and get pictures my brother-in-law couldn't get with his point and shoot. Now, when I used the same settings and took a picture from the aisle of my 3 relatives sitting next to one another only the 1st person in the pew was in focus - the other two were blurred. This was intentional on my part but if I took the same picture with my brother-in-law's digicam all 3 would be in focus. This is because digicams will have a larger depth of field (i.e. more of the image is in focus). There are instances you will want to specifically have a shallow DOF - but you should be aware of it and how aperture and distance from subject affect this so you know what to expect when you take a picture from a DSLR camera.

5. After you have those basic concepts down (and you may already so I apologize if you do) then the next step to help you get more 'keeper' photos is to understand how to read a histogram. I'll put in a link to a great article on it. After you understand the basics you should set your new camera to display the histogram after each shot - reading that rather than looking at the picture on the lcd (which is small) will help you to know instantly if your picture is either properly exposed or 'within fixable tolerances' for post processing to fix. You still may need to zoom in on the image to check whether focus was sharp - but the histogram is a much better gauge of exposer then trying to 'eyeball' a small image on the LCD screen.

6. Finally and most important - PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. My wife used to be annoyed that I take my camera everywhere - now she's used to it. Going to that confimration I mentioned - hey, great time to work on low light and flash photography. Going to watch a nephew's baseball game - great time to work on action photography. I even went to a college basketball game last fall - don't care about the team I just wanted to work on indoor sports photography. The point is - take opportunities to practice with the camera - even if you don't care about the subject matter. That way when you do care and you are at an event where you want to keep/print the photos - you'll be confident on how to use the camera and post processing tools to get the best images. And it's amazing once you start doing this how much more of the world you look at - I now notice all kinds of birds, flowers, people, buildings, etc. that I would have just ignored in the past.

Enjoy your new toy and look forward to seeing some posts!!
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Old May 20, 2005, 7:59 AM   #5
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Thanks everyone for your comments, I know photography theory and I got some practice at it,...

I´ve been talking with some professional photographers and they told me Nikon is more "resistant" than Canon,... and that Megapixels are not that important...

The would choose D70 or D100 instead of the rebel...

What do you think?
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Old May 20, 2005, 7:20 PM   #6
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what do they mean by resistant... if they are talking durability, most of the pros that shoot sports and other venues that are potentially abusive to camera equipment shoot canons.. its your choice, they are all great cameras, but i really believe that the rebel xt is at the top of the consumer grade dslrs.. just as the 20d is at the top of the prosumer dslrs.. thats not to say that they others arent excellent and would serve you just as well..
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Old May 20, 2005, 10:44 PM   #7
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SinRastro wrote:
Quote:
I´ve been talking with some professional photographers and they told me Nikon is more "resistant" than Canon,... and that Megapixels are not that important...
They wouldn't say that because Nikon doesn't have an 8mp camera??? Would they??? Naw.... They wouldn't say that because the Canon 6mp Rebel with a lens sells for less then the D70 without a lens??? Naw.... They wouldn't say that becase the Rebel takes just as good of pictures as the D70??? Naw...

HEY!!! Has anyone here ever seen a professional photographer with aCanon camera???? I think I have.... I saw it in a movie once.

dale








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Old May 21, 2005, 9:22 AM   #8
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Coming from the S5100, choosing between the RebelXT and the Nikon D70 is like choosing between a Mercedes and a BMW. Handle them both at the store, get the one that feels best to you...

However, if you appreciate sharp images like me, you'll want to forgo the kit lens and get something better. Since you are shooting action, consider a fast lens (low aperture). Here would be a great first alternative to the kit lens for you, The Tamron 28-75 f2.8 XRDi. It has a little more reach, is much faster, and image quality blows the kit lens away. Plus it is very affordable:

http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/s...&cat=43&page=1



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Old May 21, 2005, 10:54 AM   #9
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SinRastro wrote:
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Thanks everyone for your comments, I know photography theory and I got some practice at it,...

I´ve been talking with some professional photographers and they told me Nikon is more "resistant" than Canon,... and that Megapixels are not that important...

The would choose D70 or D100 instead of the rebel...

What do you think?
Most of us are not professionals. :|

And if they are professionals, then I'm not sure they would know a lot about the D70 or D100. After all, they are professionals, why bother looking at the lower end cameras?

They'd propably go for Nikon P&S cameras, too.
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