Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 27, 2005, 9:23 PM   #21
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15
Default

Loke wrote:
Quote:
What editing prog. you have? In photoshop you go to imageimage size......:-)

I am using photoshop. Am I changing the resolution to 180 - 300 pixells/inch?
jeeper31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2005, 9:35 PM   #22
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 5
Default

yes......... that's it.....:-)
Loke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2005, 9:37 PM   #23
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 5
Default

Just remeber that the file is going to get BIG........
Loke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 27, 2005, 9:43 PM   #24
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 15
Default

Loke wrote:
Quote:
Just remeber that the file is going to get BIG........
I tried it and it increased the size of the pic. when I resized the pic the resolution jumped up big time.

When I change the resolution to 180 the pic resizes to 19.2 in x 12.8 in. If I change the size back to 6x4 the resoultion changes to 576 pixils/inch.
jeeper31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2005, 5:20 AM   #25
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 5
Default

Hmmmm.... strange....... when i resize my pic. the resolution stace the same(72dpi)...
Loke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2005, 11:40 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 301
Default

I'm a bit confused by some of the above threads ... it could just be me :-)

Using Edit -> Preferences -> Units & Rulers you can set the default screen resolution to 72 pixels/inch and the default print resolution to 300 pixels/inch.

I also convert my images from Raw to jpeg with 300 pixels/inch selected along with maximum quality (Superfine) ... so I do my editing at the full 2336 x 3504 pixels from my 20D. When I go to print I have two choices:

1. Under Image -> Resize -> Image Size I enter the width of my photo for output in inches while not changing ANYTHING else (resolution stays at 300 pixels/inch). For example, when I want to print 4x6 for a image in portrait mode, I enter a 4 for the width and the other dimension automatically becomes 6 ("constrain proportions" must be checked).

2. This second methodworks for my Canon Selphy CP600 4x6 printer which has a 300 dpi print resolution. I just leave everything alone under Resize (i.e., my image shows as 2336x3504, or 7.787 inches x 11.68 inches at 300 pixels/inch. Then, instead of messing with things under Resize:
a) Under File -> Page Setup first set if your image is in Portrait or Landscape
b) Under File -> Print Preview check Scale to Fit Media
c) Print your image



The first method is great for saving images that you are sending to a minilab to print since the saved image files will be much smaller.

The advantage for me of the second method is less things to mess with. Also, I won't accidentally save my image at a much lower resolution (the reduction in file size tells you that the resolution has been reduced). If I use the first method I have to remember to save under a different filename (i.e., IMG_XXXX 4x6).

You don't require anything near a 8.2 MP camera to print 4x6 proofs at 300 pixels/inch ... a 3MP camera would probably give the exact same result. The advantage of 8.2MP is that you can print an 8x10 at 300 pixels/inch. Note, this isn't to say you can't go much larger than this ... with programs like Genuine Fractals you could make very nice poster sized prints.



Bob
BobA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2005, 3:12 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 2
Default

itseems from reading various web forums on the rebel xt, that many owners are particularly frustrated by sharpness andfocusissues on this camera. interestingly, as pointed out on the digital camera resource page review, the sharpness of this camera is less than that of many point and shoot digital cameras. i was unhappy with thesharpness on my rebel xt even when i maximized the sharpness setting on the camera, and used a high quality canon lens.

while the sharpness issue can potentially be corrected with software, this is likely to be time consuming; one shouldn't have to spend time making such adjustments on every photo one takes on a camera of this cost and purported quality. and many users have also pointed out limited success using higher end lenses to improve image quality.

while this camera has lots of potential, users who expect good photos out of the box, or withsimple in-camera adjustments may be happier with a point and shoot or a differentdigital SLR.
richard frederick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2005, 4:15 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
rob_strain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Fort Knox, Ky.
Posts: 282
Default

richard frederick wrote:
Quote:
it seems from reading various web forums on the rebel xt, that many owners are particularly frustrated by sharpness and focus issues on this camera. interestingly, as pointed out on the digital camera resource page review, the sharpness of this camera is less than that of many point and shoot digital cameras. i was unhappy with the sharpness on my rebel xt even when i maximized the sharpness setting on the camera, and used a high quality canon lens.
DSLRs are designed to be soft and give the user control over sharpness...

Quote:
while the sharpness issue can potentially be corrected with software, this is likely to be time consuming; one shouldn't have to spend time making such adjustments on every photo one takes on a camera of this cost and purported quality. and many users have also pointed out limited success using higher end lenses to improve image quality.
...by post-processing their images to their liking. Why should it be a really expensive point and shoot with interchangeable lenses.

Quote:
while this camera has lots of potential, users who expect good photos out of the box, or with simple in-camera adjustments may be happier with a point and shoot or a different digital SLR.
I agree here, if you don't want to put some effort into your photos, maybe you shouldn't have a DSLR. The point of having a DSLR is creative control to do whatever pops into the photographers head, not what the camera decides is best. If people want the camera to so all the work, get a point and shoot.
rob_strain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2005, 4:42 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 301
Default

There is no sharpness/softness issue or problemwith the Rebel XT, or any of the other Canon DSLR's. These arenot point and shoot cameras, and have been designed with a strongeranti-aliasing filter that results in the pictures being softer out of the camera. Some would even argue that photos from a P&S ... while having a lot of punch ... are not a true representation of the scene, since contrast and color saturation are pumped up. Many consumers like having images where the color is much more vivid than the actual scene, so the P&S's have been designed to satisfy this group.

To get close to a P&S you would have to turn in camera sharpening to the max (and it probably still wouldn't be enough for some),contrast up one notch and saturation up one notch. Note that higher contrast also gives the perception of an image being sharper.

I think Richard made a pretty fair statement when he said "users who expect good photos out of the box, or withsimple in-camera adjustments may be happier with a point and shoot or a differentdigital SLR". Reading all of the forums you can see that many people have purchased a DSLR thinking they will getbetter photos with even less work than with their P&S ... after all, it cost more! For me, I do get great pictures with less work ... because I also use a film SLR and do my own B&W darkroom work. I wouldn't ever give my exposed B&W film to a minilab to process it, because it would be ruined. Instead I would have to spend an entire day in a darkroom to make a good set of prints. With a DSLR, I can "process" my prints inless than 10% ofthe time I could using film.

Just my $0.02

Bob

BobA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 28, 2005, 10:19 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
bigboyhf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 165
Default

I agree that the flexability that the dslr's have with post processing is very important and that is how I fly most of the time. However, maybe there could be more adjustment levels for sharpness, contrast etc.with the extremes being equal to or closer to that of a point and shoot. After all, these camera's have all those other fancy doo-dads to print directly to a pictbridge printer!For those times when you want to utlize that function, it would be nice to be able tojust kick it up a notch or so to get additional processing in the camera...

H
bigboyhf is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:17 PM.