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Old May 24, 2005, 2:36 AM   #1
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I have just aquired an EOS 20D with the EFS 18 - 25mm lense. I have been using it to photograph my paintings. When I fill the viewfinder with a painting so that there is no spare space on either side the resultant image consistently includes the the area to the left of the painting.

That is image captured is wider than the image in the viewfinder and the additonal area is not evenly distributed left and right but appears all on the left hand side.

As far as I can make out my eye is square in the viewfinder and the effect is not due to my looking through the viewfinder at an angle.

I am sure that there is some obvious reason for this and I would greatly appreciate it if somebody with expertise could enlighten me.

Thanks
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Old May 24, 2005, 4:24 AM   #2
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Simply put, the camera has a vievfinder coverage of 95% horizontal and vertical. Not sure why one sidewould be more than the other though.


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Old May 24, 2005, 4:46 AM   #3
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I thought that the whole point about an SLR was that "What you see is what you get". Why design an SLR where the viewfinder does not show the whole image?

It doesnt make sense to me.
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Old May 24, 2005, 8:16 AM   #4
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View finder design is not an easy thing. And there are some limitations that work against each other that make the "perfect" view finder impossible. I'd suggest reading this:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/co...03-03-16.shtml

I found it very interesting and informative about view finders.

I don't know why it would be off center either. I would have expected it to be the center 95%, but I don't know if it *should* be, or I just expected that. Use that to your advantage and put a white card there. Then you'll be able to color correct your image easily in photoshop. I've photographed water color paintings before... trust me, it makes your life much easier.

Eric
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Old May 24, 2005, 8:57 AM   #5
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Thanks Eric. The article is very intereting although he does say the professional cameras have 100% viewfinder coverage.

Its a bit messy isn't it. I will have to bear in mind what the actual limits of the image are when I am composing the shot, so I can take advantage of those very expensive pixels.

I will do some tests to work out whether the top and bottom limits are biased to one side.

Thanks for the idea on using a white card when photogaphing paintings.
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