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Old May 27, 2005, 5:40 PM   #1
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hi

i am not good photographer

but i bought D 20 and sigma 18~125 dc

but i feel that some of pics r not well focused i use 9 points focusing and automatic focusing

some fotos r fine

what should i check in mycam ?

thanx any info
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Old May 27, 2005, 5:52 PM   #2
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Try this: select the center focus point and put the camera in servo mode. See if that helps until you get more comfortable with the camera.
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Old May 27, 2005, 8:25 PM   #3
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Try sharpening the pic. The 20 D needs some sharpening post processing...

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Old May 27, 2005, 8:34 PM   #4
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What was your shutter speed, it looks like there may be some camera shake there.
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Old May 27, 2005, 11:34 PM   #5
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i agree with both bigboyhf& rob_strain.. it looks to be a bit of camera shake involved.. so make sure your shutter speeds are greater than 1/(focal length used).. so if you are zoomed all the way in make sure your shutter speeds are greater than 1/125.. plus, digital slr images out of the camera always appear soft.. that is on purpose..the manufacturers are giving YOU the control over the sharpness.. so be sure to learn some post-processing.. particularly using unsharp mask (USM).. a good starting point is 100-150% radius .3 - 1.1 threshold 0-3.. play around within that range and see what looks good to you..

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"best regards, dustin

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Old May 28, 2005, 2:35 AM   #6
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Hi,

If you're taking portrait shots, use the upper focusing point. And have that point aimed at the eyes! A pro-photographer told me that when focusing on a portrait, not tried it as yet but will have a go this weekend. He told me that it's the eyes that will attract you to a good portrait, they are one the primary points to get focused properly.

I'd agree with the other points. Although, I did get both my 20D and 1dMk2 calibrated from a Canon authorised service centre and they did improve the quality of my photos!

Carl.
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Old May 30, 2005, 1:46 AM   #7
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Hi

thanx guys

for ur reply my i think my shutter speed was slow

now i will check completely and i will try all shutter speed then i will report u

thanx for all replies

azeemmir
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Old May 30, 2005, 8:22 AM   #8
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azeemmir wrote:
Quote:
Hi

thanx guys

for ur reply my i think my shutter speed was slow

now i will check completely and i will try all shutter speed then i will report u

thanx for all replies

azeemmir

Yup, this looks like motion blur. When taking pictures of people you sometimes need to use a shutterspeed of between 1/125s and 1/250s even at shorter focal lengths (less than 70mm). How you hold the camera and breath when you release the shutter can make a difference too. Note, buying a lens with IS won't help if it is your subject that is moving, but it will help if you are having trouble keeping the camera steady.

I'll also give you a couple of tips to help you with focus:

1. Be aware that you may have a tendency to sway forward or backwards if you wait a few seconds between locking the focus (pushing the shutter release halfway down) and taking the picture. If you lens is wide open, that few inches can make the persons face a bit soft. Focus on a cheek or an eye and stay rock steady until you take the picture.

2. If you focus then recompose, the focus point can be in front or behind where you would like it to be by a few inches (simple trigonometry). This can cause the subject to look a bit soft if you shoot with the lens wide open. If you need to focus/recompose, maybe try ensuring that you select a higher f-stop value (smaller aperature) to increase depth of field.



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Old May 31, 2005, 3:28 PM   #9
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azeemmir,

Its tough going to begin withon these camera. Sorry buts it just about learning all the trade off´s light, shutter speed, depth of field, hand movement, subject movement,andimplementing allbefore pushing the button. Its a lot to think about. Take it a step at a time. Read some of the tutorials on a few of the popular photographic sites. Things will get better. But only if you enjoy to spend the time on it. If not put the camera on auto.
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