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Old Jun 5, 2005, 7:59 PM   #1
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Hi! I just got my canon digital rebel xt and I'm trying to play around with it and get a feel for it. I took some outdoor shots of my daughter and husband swimming in our pool and I got some really harsh shadows on their faces. I've had this problem with other cameras too, so I know it's the photographer (me) and not the camera :GWhat can I do to get clear outdoor pictures? Any help with be appreciated. And I'm a novice so help me understand LOL!
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Old Jun 5, 2005, 8:12 PM   #2
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Try using flash for your outdoors shots when your subject has harsh shadows to see if it helps. The popup flash may be good enough for close up shots, but you would need something more powerful if you are more than, say, 6 ft away. The following article may be helpful:

http://www.naturephotographers.net/a.../jm0503-1.html



Regards,

Bob
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 1:47 AM   #3
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It's a matter of always thinking of your position and the suns position to your subjects. The sun should be over your shoulder(behind you in some way)to get the best exposure and even lighting. With side or rear lighting(which can be used to great effect)some flash to fill in the light(fill flash)will help greatly.
Your in camera meter will expose for the majority of the photograph, so if most of the photo is light colored or bright, the dark spots(faces)will be dark.
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Old Jun 6, 2005, 2:31 AM   #4
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I agree with what you are saying. However, sometimes you don't have a choice with where your subject is going to be positioned ... so flash can help.



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Old Jun 8, 2005, 5:05 AM   #5
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BobA wrote:
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I agree with what you are saying. However, sometimes you don't have a choice with where your subject is going to be positioned ... so flash can help.



Bob
Yes but if you keep the lighting in the back of your mind, you can try to be on the correct side of the pool. You cannot determin where the subjects are, but you can try to positon yourself to take advantage of the light. It is kind of a habit that you can get yourself into. Of course if every one is looking at something and you are on the other side you will get well exposed shots of the back of there heads! When at a party I try to positon myself so the light is hitting the subject best. Sometimes my wife/kids wonder why I walk away from them, but my photos are usually better than my friends. I have been known to wonder to the apponenent's side at sporting events to get good shots of my kids. The ohter side of the coin is that if the sun is strong, and you have it at your back you may only get photos of squinting people, and that is not attractive either so it is a balence that must be acheaved. Yes a flash will help on close subjects with back lighting, just be aware of the limits of your flash. I say the best way is to try it lots of ways. I like to shoot a dog or even a doll or something when practicing. That is the joy of digital. You can shoot hundreds of shots just to see how they come out, then when it really counts you have been there and done that. You could not do that with film, unless you are really rich.
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