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Old Aug 2, 2005, 6:15 AM   #1
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This seems to be a reoccurring problem in many of my photos,so maybe you might be able to help. I have always used manual settings on my cameras and I think I have a pretty good grasp of what my exposures should be,or at least with film cameras anyway. So now i have my lcd screen set on my 20D to show the histogram right after I take a shot.I do a lot of landscape shots with partial sky in the background and time after time even bracketing ,there is the sky blinking at me in the shot after i took the picture.If I try underexposing even up to 2 stops sometime it still blinks,telling me the highlights are overexposed. I do like a lot of contrast in my pictures so maybe thats why it shows up so much.

So Is there some way to correct this?Or is it a problem like Slide vs print film where slide didn't have the range?
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 2:21 PM   #2
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dslrs have a range similar to slide film... therefore neutral density grads are a must for landscapes...

or you can cheat and expose for the sky, then open up the land in shadows/highlights tool.. then demask the sky to bring it back out..
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 6:08 PM   #3
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I mostly agree with Hard80's comments, but I would add that DSLRs seem to have little head room and it's very easy to over expose. I don't know about the film you used to use, but you might be used to something that more gracefully tapers off in the hilights.

I agree about the NG filter. This is exactly what they are for.

Eric
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 10:21 PM   #4
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I had (still have sometimes) the overexposure issue. I was used to film for a long time, left photography and came back to it over the last few months. I remember it being a bit easier to get proper exposure. It could be that film is just more forgiving or that relearning things I haven't done for almost 8 years is the culprit, hard to say.
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 10:27 PM   #5
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the is a great book called Understanding Exposure (revised addition) published by Amphoto Books. Lots of info for film and digital. I picked it up at Hastings for about $25.
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 11:29 PM   #6
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If it is a static subject and you have PS CS2 you can take multiple exposures at different settings and use the "high bit depth merge" function that will merge the the 16bit raw images into one 32bit image with a much higher dynamic range than the camera is capable of producing.

PS CS2 has some interesting new tools :-).

C35Guy what kind of film were you using?
Slide film has a 3-4 stop range,
C41 film has a 5-6 stop range,
and well done B&W can have a 9-10 stop range.
As Hards80 said consumer digital is matching the slide film level.

Peter.
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Old Aug 3, 2005, 7:47 AM   #7
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About 70% B&W (Ilford), the rest C41, never used slide film except in college. I'm getting the hang of it now, though...I no longer am hunting for which button or menu does what on my XT, that alone makes it a little easier. I usually shoot about a stop below what the camera thinks is proper exposure and that works pretty well most of the time.
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Old Aug 3, 2005, 9:59 AM   #8
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Ya, that would be it, going from very high range B&W and high range c41 to slide/digital takes a bit of getting used to.

At least with digital you are not paying cash for each mistake as you step up through the learning curve.

Peter.

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Old Aug 3, 2005, 10:06 AM   #9
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I don't think its just the learning curve,digital just doesn't handle contrast as well or at all when it comes to certain situations,especially landscapes with bright skies.So you have a few choices;Shooting in RAW,or shooting 2 exposures,one for detail and one for background and then combine them with something like Fred Miranda's DRI Pro which automatically combines 2 images.

Print film just had more range which digital can't quite handle yet at least as i said in certain situations.
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Old Aug 3, 2005, 10:33 AM   #10
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Bsmooth,

Yes, that is what the last couple of posts were about.
And adobe PS CS2 has the multiple merge funtiion built in.
If you use it right you can match or excede the range of normal print film.
But of course this only works for static subjects.

It also depends where you come from in the film world, for the last 25 or so years I shot nothing but slide film and that matches the range you get with digital fairly well. So for me there were no issues making the change.

The hardest part for me is the storage, slides were catalogued, duped and went into slide storage. sleves.

Digital is all over the place, on failure prone hard drives, cd's dvd's, backup hard-drives.

Peter.




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