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Old Aug 24, 2005, 1:11 PM   #11
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Yes, that's what the M mode on the dial is. I would highly recommend reading the entire manual, you've got a relatively complex camera there and if you don't know what the features are and how to use them, you'll never fully use all that money you spent.
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 1:13 PM   #12
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I would highly recommend checking out this thread and the links it contains for some good tutorials to help you understand shutter speed, ISO, aperature, etc...

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=85
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 1:18 PM   #13
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Thank you very much. I will read that thread and go over the manual again (it's a little over my head for now)
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 1:51 PM   #14
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Understandable, I'd recommend this tutorial to start, it explains things pretty well.

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/classroom.php
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 10:19 PM   #15
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Hi Doug,

One simple rule:

If you double the Iso, you have to cut the shutterspeed in half to get the same exposure.

Here are some sites with great tips and lessons for beginners:

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQueri...q-locale=en_US

http://www.sas.org/E-Bulletin/2004-0...otes/body.html

http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm

http://visual-vacations.com/Photogra...pose_sucks.htm

http://jzportraits.home.att.net/

http://www.camera.canon.com.my/archi...graphy/art.htm



Enjoy!



Bob
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Old Aug 25, 2005, 3:11 AM   #16
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I bought some expensive Hoya Pro UV filters to protect my lenses.

What a ridiculous waste of money that was. They caused problems with both lenses - vignetting on the 17-85, and severe image degradation on the 70-300 DO.

So I thought about it and realised that for years I had used filters on my lenses and never actually scratched a filter. The lens hood protects the lenses front elements far better anyway.


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Old Aug 25, 2005, 3:25 AM   #17
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i agree.. i used to use haze or skylights on all my lenses.. but no more, couldnt live with the image degredation.. now i just use the hood, and have had no scratches...

i often leave my polarizer on during bright daylight though..
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Old Aug 25, 2005, 9:04 AM   #18
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Also agree. A hood is a better investment than a UV filter. A hood helps eliminate flare, while the UV filter only makes it worse ... and both do a good job of protecting the front lens element. And on a digital camera a UV filter does nothing to enhance the quality of your images.

Some people still insist on using UV filters for lens protection though. So if the original poster is in that camp, he should at least get a good multi-coated one to ensure that he minimizes problems.
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