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Old Aug 23, 2005, 6:04 PM   #1
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Hi everyone,

I've been reading the forums and I just purchased a Canon Rebel XT. I'm totally new to photography so I just got the standard kit for now. I really need a good case for it and I do plan to eventually get a good lens for zooming far (can these also be used for macros or are they different kinds of lenses?).

My question was:

Is the canon accesory kit worth it? As far as I can tell it comes with this stuff:

Lowepro EX180 bag with a canon label attached $90 CDN or so
UV filter - seems like only useful as lens protection about $20 CDN
The battery magazine extra which is $170-$190 CDN
and of course the extra battery.

Would you guys recommmend I get this kit seeing as how I need a case of some sort, and i'll definitely get th eextra battery/magainze at some point? The price for me would be about $280 hopefully maybe $20 less if I can bargain with bestbuy (CDN).

Please let me knwo your opinions! I look forward to learning more about this camera!!

Doug
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Old Aug 23, 2005, 11:13 PM   #2
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I say shop around... That kit isn't going anywhere... Work with what you have and get a feel for what you need... Maybe after you get used to the camera you'll find out what accessories you really want...

With the exception of the filter and a spare battery... And a 1G CF card if you don't have one already... I wouldn't get the battery clip until you really need it. Starting any given day with two charged batteries is all I've ever really needed...

Life's too short to have a crappy bag that you didn't pick out yourself... I would put a little more thought into it... Go to a place with a big selection and check them out...



Good Luck!
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Old Aug 23, 2005, 11:32 PM   #3
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I agree with Jimg1212. For me, I wouldn't go with the kit for the following reasons:

1. A $20 Cdn($16 US) UV filter sounds a bit cheap, and suspect that it isn't a very high quality filter. For the kit lens the cheapest Hoya multicoated filter is $21 US, and an S-HMC filter is $33. The B+W version is $35 US.

2. I'd pick a bag after seeing what other equipment I was going to end up with to support my hobby. You have to really think about this one ... 'cause you are going to lug it around, so it has to be comfortable.

3. You can buy 3rd party batteries from Sterlingtek that are reported to be as good as Canon batteries for much less money.

4. Do you really need a grip?



Bob
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 6:43 AM   #4
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Thanks for the input guys.

I went to pick it up last night and I was actually a little disappointed with the bag - it looks like it's designed for the camera to go in lens down and sort of balance on these bending flaps which seems odd. I opened up all the packaging etc but I'm sure bestbuy will still take it back - I can't believe Canon would put their name on this bag.

I have purchased a 2GB Kingston Elite Pro compact flash card for $120CDN+tax and it should arrive hopefully by beginning of September.

I guess the extra battery/filter/grip can wait until I'm ready for them.

I had one other question - Whenever I try to remove my battery from the camera it's very difficult - I slide the orange locking to the side but the battery doesn't pop out or anything it just sorta stays there and I'm forced to pry it out with my nails - has anyone else had this problem?

Thanks again,

Doug
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 8:07 AM   #5
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Doug,

The XT I have was the same way with the battery clip... I've had it for a couple months and its only now starting to "pop out" when I push the clip. Just give it time, it'll loosen up with use.
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 8:24 AM   #6
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I have the Lowepro 180 and love it, but I bought mine for $28, new on Ebay. It holds my cam with lens on, Sigma 500 flash, extra batteries, and 2 or 3 extra lenses with room to spare. I think you'll find a lot of camera bags for SLR have a set where the camera goes in lens-down, it's quite common.

And, get a filter NOW. Even if you only get a cheaper one, it will save you from dirtying/scratching your lens at the very least.
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 9:04 AM   #7
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There is no need to buy a cheap filter. Always buy a good multicoated one or you will suffer from lens flare when you take images outside.
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 12:46 PM   #8
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I saw some filter that made the images look really vibrant and it looked great but I forget what it's called now - but I just assumed if you get a fancy filter you'd have to remove it sometimes for certain pictures??


Does anyone know where there is a thorough guide on camera settings for this camera - or I guess just cameras in general? I tried playing around in P mode and when I set the camera to ISO 1600, the shutter would be really fast - whereas when I set it to 100 ISO the shutter would take a few seconds and the picture would be all blurry. I thought it was backwards in that 1600 would stay open longer than 100?


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Old Aug 24, 2005, 12:57 PM   #9
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No, ISO ratings are the speed of the "film", not the shutter...though it will definitely affect shutter speed.

A fast ISO (ie. 1600) will allow you to use a faster shutter speed because it is more sensitive to light. But, you will lose quality in the image. As a general rule, always shoot at the lowest ISO you can for the image you are trying to capture.
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Old Aug 24, 2005, 12:59 PM   #10
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I see - that's what I suspected. Since I was using low ISO then the camera was automatically compensating by having longer shutter times to get enough light.

Is there any way I can control both the ISO and the shutter speed?
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