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Old Sep 7, 2005, 12:48 PM   #11
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bobbyz wrote:
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Anyone got shots (with 100% crops) at low SS with any telephoto with > 400mm focal length on Konica Minolta, would love to see.
FYI - http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=13734588
(The 1st shot is 1/250s at 500)

so is this one: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=14675568

... and some birds too: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=13516480
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Old Sep 7, 2005, 5:24 PM   #12
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Peter,
What were the "deal breakers" the 7D had that the 5D corrects?
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Old Sep 7, 2005, 5:46 PM   #13
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If you look at Mike Johnston's Catch the Rave! article that I mentioned earlier, you'll see links to download Peter Gregg's article on the Flash Photography with the Konica-Minolta 7D.

This article discusses it's pros and cons (as well as some workarounds for some of it's quirks). It's a .pdf article including photos to demonstrate his points.

Here is a direct link to where Peter's article can be found. You'll see it on the page listed as "Flash with the Konica-Minolta 7D".

http://www.lulu.com/bearpaw

If you read the article, I got the impression that the main "deal breaker" for Peter was how Konica-Minolta disables the meter if you are in M mode on the camera and turn on the 5600HS (D), or any other compatible KM flash.

The 5D leaves the meter operational in M mode with flash.

I am unaware of any further changes with the 5D yet regarding flash behavior. But, Peter may be aware of some more that I'm not (and he may be able to fill you in on any other behavior he considers to be a deal breaker).

But, I'd read his article and it should answer most of your questions.

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Old Sep 8, 2005, 4:21 AM   #14
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JimC

Did you see the new Sony announcement?
Sweet hey on a 9D (or some Nikon) may be? - 10Mpixels APS-c CMOS sensor up to 3200 iSO
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Old Sep 8, 2005, 7:43 AM   #15
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Yes, I saw it.

It's about a 1.67x crop from my calculations, so I think we'll be probably be seeing a larger sensor in the 9D (rumoured to be full frame, but you never can tell about rumours).

I don't know if this onewill be used in any DSLR models or not. Sigma has a sensor that's slightly smaller in their DSLR models, and of course, the Kodak sensors used by Olympus are even smaller (4/3 system).

I guess we'll have to wait and see if Sony provided this sensor to others, too. If they did, then more models should follow (as they typically do when Sony releases a new sensor).

I alsowouldn't be surprised to see a model jointlydeveloped by KM and Sony (with anti-shake) using it. Only time will tell (I haven't heard any rumours with any specifics).

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Old Sep 8, 2005, 8:06 AM   #16
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Yeap

I can hear the bells at Nikon/Minolta ringing already - From history Sony always comes out first (since they developed the sensor) and shortly thereafter Nikon then Minolta came out with their own version. Interesting time indeed especially when the 20D is due to be updated as well... Jingle Bell!!!

With regard to the KM's flash, the behaviour is only strange if one is used to the Canon system (I was surprised at first to see automatic flash in E-TTL with the M mode). However if you've started out first with the Minolta this feature is kind of convenient, if you work in the studio with other external lights (you'll be measuring off from an external meter anyway) - On the Canon you'll need to fiddle with the external flash unit (an extra step) to overide its automatic mode.
IMO the Minolta system with its separate TTL/ADI selection is also more 'controllable' than the Canon. Sometime you just don't know what the camera think... at least with the Minolta one can select one over the other - I believe the newer canon like the 20D address the E-TTL by letting you switch to an average or something...

The Minolta wireless has came a long way (it precedes Canon by almost a decade): http://www.friedmanarchives.com/flash.htm
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Old Sep 8, 2005, 8:14 AM   #17
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I don't like a preflash, and the only way to avoid it with a KM DSLR (using a compatible KM Flash system) is to go manual (ADI or TTL both use a preflash withDSLR models, as their is no OTF metering during the exposure like you have with film models).

Personally, I'll probably go Metz 54MZ4 if I buy one ofKM'sDSLRmodels (that way, I can use the Auto Mode and avoid the preflash). I guess I could just use an old Vivitar or something, since I've got oneI sometimes use on anold Nikon.

But, then I'd lose HSS, which the Metz 54MZ series flashes support via the latest SCA3302M5 module with KM DSLR models, and I'd need to set the flash to match the camera each time I changed ISO speed or aperture with a non-dedicated system.

This Metz avoids this issue (it's aware of your camera settings with the correct module), and elminates the need for a preflash using it's Auto Mode.It wouldn't be aware of your metering mode, focus point, etc.in Auto Mode. But, I personally don't care. I'll compensate when needed.

P.S.

I'm alsonot convinced there is a lot of advantage to ADI lenses with a KM DSLR. I'veseen it demonstrated that even non-ADI lenses report the focus distance to the camera (although perhaps not quite as accurately as ADI lenses, it's pretty close from reports I've seen from developers analyzing the data).

Since both modes use a preflash anyway, why bother from my perspective (I haven't seen anyone demonstrating that one mode is more accurate than the other yet for exposure anyway). But, I haven't seen any controlled conditions tests comparing the two modes.

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Old Sep 8, 2005, 8:33 PM   #18
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JimC wrote:
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I guess we'll have to wait and see if Sony provided this sensor to others, too. If they did, then more models should follow (as they typically do when Sony releases a new sensor).
I guess everyone should have seen it coming:
"The new imager is generally viewed as an announcement by Sony that it will be replacing its entire line of charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, for which it holds the top share, with CMOS sensors for products like digital cameras and camcorders."
http://neasia.nikkeibp.com/neasia/000013

... especially here: http://www.photozone.de/active/feature/dslrs.jsp

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I don't like a preflash, and the only way to avoid it with a KM DSLR (using a compatible KM Flash system) is to go manual
Again that's how my previous Dimage 7i worked as well - they assumed you're synching to an external studio flash in this mode so no pre-flash (even the built-in will not preflash via a menu option) - On my Canon even in manual, the built-in flash remains on auto and will pre-flash that you can't overide :O
I posted before on how one can overcome this pre-flash with the FEL button on the Canon, but that's really a bandaid :sad:
It's a matter of design philosophy, and what system you're used to... first :idea:
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Old Sep 8, 2005, 9:02 PM   #19
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NHL wrote:
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It's a matter of design philosophy, and what system you're used to... first :idea:

My pocket camera doesn't need a preflash (built in sensor to monitor reflected light, just like an Auto Thyristor flash). My old Nikon Coolpix models don't need a preflash (same type of sensor).

My film cameras don't need a preflash, and I'm not buying a Konica-Minolta DSLRflash system that needs a preflash, either.

I'll use an Auto Thyristor type system first (and Metz has a flash that offers the best of both, since it's Auto Mode is aware of the camera's ISO speed and Aperture Settings like a dedicated flash, with a sensor to measure reflected light during the exposure like a non-dedciated Auto Thyristor flash).

I can still remember your post titled "Don't Shoot the Messenger", with a link to an article that tested flash sytems. They alsoconcluded that Auto modes are more consistent compared to newer so called TTL flash modes.


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Old Sep 8, 2005, 9:13 PM   #20
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JimC wrote:
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I can still remember your post titled "Don't Shoot the Messenger", with a link to an article that tested flash sytems. They alsoconcluded that Auto modes are more consistent.
No argument here!

I tend to agree too, but an Auto mode system is quite limited especially when it comes to multi-units with various ratio...

This is where the pre-flashes come in where each head is measured separately before the exposure and where they all fire at once for the final shot and all outputing the correct amount for each light!
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