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Old Sep 10, 2005, 12:02 PM   #11
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I think what you need to do is to download from Dry Creek Photo the color profile for the printer at your local Costco (assuming that Dry Creek Photo has this particular Costco in their database). Use the profile according to the instructions that Dry Creek Photo provides and then also follow their instructions as to what you must tell the processing people at the Costco to do when printing your images. It's all spelled out in their instructions.

Let us know how things turn out after you've tried it (I have my own printer and haven't needed to do this but if you get positive results I might try it).
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Old Sep 10, 2005, 1:10 PM   #12
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I agree with Geoffs (in fact, I was going to say basically the same thing until I saw that he posted it) but I disagree with Caboose.

It is still definitely worth getting your monitor correct. It clearly isn't worth buying a good printer... as you've already stated that you want to print elsewhere.

But you should profile your monitor using the systems I describe, until you get results you are happy with. The ultimate (and easy) way to do it is with a hardware profiling device. But they cost a noticable amount of money, so you might not want to go that route.

You see, you once you get the profile from drycreek, then you you can view the image in the color space of the printer. But if your monitor is displaying green as blue (extreme example) it won't matter what you do... it will look wrong. So you gotta get your monitor in a good state, and then get the profile for the printer you'll use (from drycreek) and then you'll be able to view your image and it should be very close to what you'll get on paper.

Monitors are light generating devices, paper is a light reflecting device. So it won't be perfectly the same. But you should be able to get it very close... to the point that you won't notice the difference.

Eric
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Old Sep 10, 2005, 1:34 PM   #13
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What Eric said - plus, the Dry Creek instructions go into how you can use Photoshop's proofing facility so that you can try (only try, can't be perfect) and see on the crt whatyour imagewould look like on the printed page...
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