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Old Jan 2, 2006, 6:49 PM   #1
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Hi everyone,

I read that the operating temps for a rebel XT are something like 0-30C but I really want to use my camera tomorrow at Niagara falls. I'm really worried for two reasons.

1. The temperature is expected to be -1C. I am wondering if it's safe to use the camera in this temp range. I know that if you go inside after you're supposed to put the camera into a ziploc - is this JUST the camera, or camera+lens, or what?

2. There will probably a lot of mist in the area. Will this mist get inside my camera and ruin it or should I be safe to go?

Thanks for the responses!

Doug
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Old Jan 2, 2006, 7:00 PM   #2
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the temperature shouldnt cause you any problems.. maybe slight decrease in battery life, but i really doubt it..

as for the mist, just use common sense.. keep a towel and keep it wrapped around it when you are not shooting, but a little mist when you do shoot shouldnt be a problem at all..

enjoy,
dustin
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Old Jan 2, 2006, 7:51 PM   #3
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Thanks for the response. This is my first actual "outting" with my camera so hopefully I'll come back with some decent pictures

I'm going to take my bag with me (lowepro ex180) and I'll just keep it inside there unless I'm using it. I also have 5 batteries so it shouldn't be a problem!

What about the temperature when I go back inside? Do I just toss the entire camera+lens into a ziploc for awhile or should it not really cause any problems?

Thanks!

Doug
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Old Jan 2, 2006, 9:19 PM   #4
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Putting the camera in a bag should help in cuttingdown on condensation. If you have a long trip in a car,to get home,the camera should warm up gradually and moisture won't be as big a problem. If you can keep your spare batteries in your pocket next to your body so that they are warm., you'll get better cold weatherperformance. You can get as little as 50% of the power duration due to extreme cold. That's an advantage film still has over digital. (please don't flame film guys) :-)

Bill
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 3:40 PM   #5
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whats film? :blah:
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 3:57 PM   #6
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I have never thought twice about using my camera in the cold. I bought an S30 as my first digital camera, I worked in northern Alaska in that spring, with temperatures hovering at -40F, and I didn't hesitate to shoot pictures of this unique experience. I now routinely use my 10D in all conditions including temperatures below 32F on a regular basis. The biggest thing I've noticed is reduced battery performance, and keeping the batteries in my pocket refreshes them and allows for more shots.
I just keep my camera in my Lowepro bag when I return to the house, and let it acclimate in there for about an hour when I return home. I live in a dry climate, and I am lucky to have very little condensation problem.
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Old Jan 3, 2006, 5:03 PM   #7
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wsandman1 wrote:
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That's an advantage film still has over digital. (please don't flame film guys) :-)
You say that, but the old Canon A-1 Dad used to have used to get through batteries pretty quickly. I thought most modern film SLRs still relied on batteries for the light metering, autofocus etc., so the percentage of life lost on the battery would probably still affect the camera in the same way... or am I totally wrong?

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Old Jan 3, 2006, 7:15 PM   #8
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When I first started shooting, most of the cameras hadcompletely manual modes that didn't require any battery power. There were some general rules (listed in the film instructions forKodak film) that suggested shutter speeds and apeture values based on sunny, overcast, or indoor shooting conditions. If you lose power with a digital camera, it's all over. I based my comments on comments from featured wildlife/nature photographers (photo magazines) who said they had stopped using film for everything except when shooting in the Artic (extreme cold, sub zero F). I assumed it due to very low battery life. Since it's so cold that you really can't take the batteries out of your shirt pockets, that trick can't be used to extend battery life.

The only time I ever has a problem with film was when the lens diaphram blades froze. I supposed the slow down of chemical reaction of the film, due to the cold could cause exposure problems.
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