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Old Jan 29, 2006, 5:59 PM   #11
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Idan,
If you are used to a point and shoot camera, then you may be pleasantly suprised by the shallower dof you get from a typical dslr, no matter which lens you choose. Generally, the larger the sensor, the shallower the dof. P&S have small sensors. Generally, the more mp, the larger the sensor is, and the shallower the dof.
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 5:59 PM   #12
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Idan wrote:
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I've tested many images and compare them and still the same results.
This is what one get in a controlled condition:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond50/page23.asp
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 6:02 PM   #13
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Well, I like to use a lens 17mm at the wide end for indoor people stuff.

That way, you can be standing just a few feet away from them and get a good photo.

For low light, you could get an F2.8 max aperture lens.

However, the Canon 17-85 is still worth looking at because of it's image stabilization.

I've seen some really nice photos off that lens.

Another nice lens for portraits is the Canon 85mm F1.8 lens.

-- Terry
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 8:56 PM   #14
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Idan wrote:
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I've tested many images and compare them and still the same results.
You'll also find some comparison images in the Nikon D50 review here (scroll down to the bottom of the samples page and you'll see them):

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_...0_samples.html

However, you'll see different metering behavior, Autofocus behavior, etc. between different cameras (not to mention a wide range of adjustments you can make to how an image is being processed).

IOW, your skill as a photographer (and experience with your gear) is going to be more important than the differences between these two camera models. Both are capable of providing good images in the right hands.

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Old Jan 29, 2006, 9:18 PM   #15
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I kind of had the same problem but it was between the canon and the D70.

I went with the rebel. I love it. There comes a time when two cameras are about the same when you just got to make a decision and not look back. Be happy with the one you pick. This camera will give you great shots that you are looking for. Like the guys say, most of it comes down to the photographer and the lenses.

Good luck, go with the canon you wontregretit.

BG
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 11:35 PM   #16
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Great explanation with the "parameters" advice! I came back from shooting today and I wish I had known that beforehand. That will be helpful in the same setting next time out!

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