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Old Jan 29, 2006, 10:21 AM   #1
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I decided to buy the Canon 350D, but I have a few things that made me think twice before I open my wallet for this camera. :?

1. Soft images - Have seen many pictures, compared it with the D50 and the images are much softer on the Canon, is it because the defaults processing in the camera, if I'll change the sharpness in the camera would it change the result.

2. The lens Kit 18-55 -Is it worth anything ?



If you have photos with the lens kit please show some I will appreciate it very much, It's hard for me to decide and I really need your feedback on this cam, as you can see I've Looked at Nikon D50 andCanon 350D and haven't decided yet.



regards,

Idan.

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Old Jan 29, 2006, 11:12 AM   #2
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Idan,

Looking at shots from one camera and comparing to shots from another is tricky business without a controlled environment. If you're purely looking at photos one person posted with the D50 and another person posted with the 350D it really isn't a good comparison. Even assuming the pics were of the same thing at the same time, there are still 3 major variables at play:

1. Skill of photographer can be an issue

2. What lens was used on each camera and was the picture taken at the lens' sweet spot or at a problem spot (most lenses have an focal legnth and/or aperture where they shine and most have the same where they are week)

3. What post processing was done.

So, having said all that, I think most unbiased reviews I've read have stated overall image quality from both cameras is about equal. Yes, you can bump up Canon's in-camera options if you prefer that over the finer control alloted by doing it in Post Processing. The kit lens with the 350 is a very decent lens for what it is. It is not going to compete with professional quality glass, but it is not a slouch - especially for people who don't yet know what exactly they need from a lens - how wide or how long, macro, maximum aperture etc. But remember, no manufacturer is going to include top of the line glass with their camera body. If you haven't already done so I suggest you go to a shop and try out both cameras - don't underestimate the importance of ergonomics in a camera. I personally didn't like the feel and size of the 350 - others do. But, don't worry about the sharpness aspect - the canon is definitely a match for the Nikon in that regard.
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 1:48 PM   #3
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Please see this ! -- and I did the comparison betwin all the other same pictures.



Rebel XTand D50 (click the name for the linked page) and Rebel XT and D50
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 3:19 PM   #4
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The Rebel may well produce soft images straight out of the camera, however you can set the sharpness with a parameter setting in the menus.

At first I was worried that my 20D was producing soft images (used to that hard edged digital look), so I set up the parameter by +1 and now my images are very sharp.

Biggest difference between the Rebel XT and the D50 is 6 meg and 8 meg sensor.

I've seen some images off the 18-55 and they are reasonable.

Yes, you can improve image quality by purchasing a lens that costs several hundred dollars more.

Some places sell the Rebel XT or the Canon 20D and the Canon 17-85 IS lens together as a kit.

Now your talking serious photographic tools.

Terry



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Old Jan 29, 2006, 4:00 PM   #5
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JohnG wrote:
Quote:
1. Skill of photographer can be an issue
IMO JohnG got it right...

It's not a problem of sharpness, but of exposure!!!

The pictures were clearly not taken at the same time (i.e. un-controlled test conditions) judging by the shadows: all the details were lost in the Canon because of the overexposure in the highlights. The Nikon pictures were taken later in the day where the dynamic range is less helping both the shadow/highlights areas...

I would recommend to test the cameras in the reverse order and see if the outcome would be different :idea:
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 4:10 PM   #6
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I've tested many images and compare them and still the same results.

So does anyone have samples from a Rebel with different sharpen parameters?:|


The difference in price here is 250$ between the two (rebel costs more) so does it have more advantages other then he 8 MP ?

I tested them both in my hands, and the canon is small and has a plastic feel to it, also the screen is very smaller, on the other side, the Nikon D50 feels great in my hand real good construction and look more professional, so you understand that the feel in my hand was cowards the Nikon, But I was thinking that for the price of the canon with the kit lens (18-55) I can buy the Nikon D50 with a better lens instead of the body one and have a better image quality for the same price !, So the decision is still hard, I like the colors of the Canon very much and the possibility that I can buy the canon and buy new lens after some time when I can, and have a better specifications' camera is also goes cowards the Nikon. Dam it's really making the choice more difficult again.



I posted this thread here, because I know some of you have the Digital Rebel and maybe you had the same conflict that I have, and probably tried the D50. So again I need to ask you to give me more detailed info about the advantages of the Canon and if those can reflect a better image composition for an amateur 1st SLR photographer that wants a lot of creativity tool and want to take photography hobby even further.

Regards,

Idan
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 4:35 PM   #7
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Ifyou could try both, then you'd know which you like better.

If you like the feel of the D50 maybe that's the right camera for you.

However, once you've made an investment in lenses, it's expensive to move from Nikon to Canon or Canon to Nikon in the future.

Terry
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 4:44 PM   #8
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Does Nikon have alens for 250$ that is better then the Kit-one ? I want to have a short DOF as possible and a good zoom (min. x4)

And BTW how can I know the zoom factor in each len ? (it doesn't say x2, x6 etc.)
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Old Jan 29, 2006, 5:14 PM   #9
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Idan,

You must move away from zoom factor and start talking focal length.

For instance, the 18-55 is a fairly wide angle, short throw zoom.

Most people start their kit with a "walk around lens", which is a lens that is used for typical touristy stuff.

For instance, the Canon 17-85 IS lens is considered an excellent walk around lens. This lens attached to a Rebel XT or a Canon 20D is going to produce pleasing results.

Later on, you might decide you need a longer focal length lens, so you might go for a 70-200 or 70-300 lens.

Beyond that, many photographers look at "prime" (non-zoom) lenses for specific applications.

For instance, an 85mm F1.8 prime lens is considered a great portrait lens.

Of course all this costs money, so there are tradeoffs.

Sounds like you need to spend a little more time researching your needs.

Terry

A few questions:

Why do you want short depth of field?

How often do you plan to use this camera?

What do you plan to take pictures of?



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Old Jan 29, 2006, 5:29 PM   #10
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Why do you want short depth of field?

I like portrait photos that the background is blured and the Subject of the photo is more pronouned. So generaly liked that effect.

How often do you plan to use this camera?


I plan to use the camera as much as I can, 3 times a week, mostly on weekend when going to trips.

What do you plan to take pictures of?


Portrait, Street, Landscape, but mostly photos of people I love (ofcourse some indoors)


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