Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon EOS dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 24, 2006, 12:09 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
jar0110's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1
Default

When i say newbie, I mean NEWBIE-I'm new to anything beyond a point-&shoot film camera (like Brownie & instamatic 110):shock:

I've read about the general rule of thumb to use a minimum shutter speed of 1/focal length to avoid camera shake. I'm wondering if the 1.6 crop/magnification factor needs to be taken into consideration. For example with a focal length of 250 * 1.6 is like using a 400mm lense, so would you want to use a minimum shutter speed of 1/250 or 1/500?

In other words what I'm trying to ask is if the 1.6 factor affects camera shake? Is really like zooming in 1.6 times more oris itlike taking a picture at the actuall focal length andcropping it?

Thanks!!!!

Jeanette
- Hoping to soon be the proud owner of a 350D andsome sort of lens or 2
- Dreaming of a 30D . . .


jar0110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 27, 2006, 10:14 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 69
Default

Good question. Anyone have an answer?
ropp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 28, 2006, 5:40 AM   #3
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

That's because no one has the answer because it's just a 'general rule of thumb':
http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...ad.php?t=48748


Let's not re-hash everything here, but this is my practical finding through many images:
-> Camera shake is also affected by the distance to the subject (and not just the focal lenght) - I can regularly handheld a shot well under the 1/focal lenght up close, but not if the same subject is further away, where a small shake can be magnified by the distance:




1/350s f/5.6 at 600.0mm (Sigma 120-300 f/2.8 with a 2x teleconverter) - i.e. no IS on a cropped camera...

NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 28, 2006, 8:07 AM   #4
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

BTW I would not let some 'rule of thumb' to limit my creativity - Experiment folks!!!

-> I shoot birds in flight a lot and tend to push for as slow of a shutter as I could (even in full daylight) because a lot of time I don't want a frozen bird in midair for example. What I found is 1/750s (@ 600mm) works best because this speed preserves the wing tips movement while freezing the stationary parts - Applying the crop factor here would definetly kill this effect for me!

At other times it could go even slower still:


NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 28, 2006, 5:08 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
101Linda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 305
Default

The 1.6 is a crop factor, not a magnification. However, it does have to be taken into consideration for the same reason why some shots look sharp and in-focus until you start zooming in on the subject and find outthats not the case.



But bottom line is NHL is exactly right, and there are way too many other factors in taking a sharp picture to take any one rule of thumb too seriously
101Linda is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:41 PM.