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Old Apr 11, 2006, 1:31 PM   #1
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I've purchased 30D two weeks ago. My first digital SLR. Have Elan II and Powershot A-80. Using Sigma 17-70/2.8-4.5 and EF 70-300 (cheap regular lens).

Camera is really fast, nicely sized, looks good and has potential of making good pictures. Lots of fitures which are easy to learn, at least for Canon user.

One of the reasons I didn't go for Rebel XT was LCD screen size. I am not as young anymore and hate 1.5" LCD and expected a lot from 2.5".

One problem with 30D I have, and other people complained, is that when picture is magnified (10x or so) it is not as sharp as it should be. Or, it is always more blury than on the computer screen. I really find out that this screen is not good enough to be sure if picture is sharp or not. I've already had couple of pictures taken been slightly soft for the reason me not being able to confirm the sharpness on the screen.

As relativelly experienced amateur photographer, my pictures shouldn't be blury anyway, but even the steadiest hand can malfunction sometimes. I do not use tripod often but thinking of getting monopod.

Any 30D user comment?
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 12:47 AM   #2
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You can't depend on any camera LCD to judge sharpness. That quality LCD would cost too much money. Just exposure and composition with it only.

I would also suggest that you set the brightness to match your monitor. It might make it hard to read at times, but then you'll have a really good idea if you got the exposure right.

DSLR cameras produce softer images than point-and-shoot. It is intentional. You can increase the incamera sharpening for jpg images and that might be more to your liking.

The reason they are less sharp is because adding sharpening is fairly easy, but removing it is hard. People who buy DSLRs are more serious about their shooting and (in general) want more control over their images in post processing. That is the market they are aiming for.

Eric
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 2:55 PM   #3
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Thanks, I think you are right; let's do some simple math.

Average computer LCD monitor is 1280 x 1024 pixels which comes to 0.293mm pixel size. Number of pixels is 1,310,720.

Actual Canon 30D picture size in pixels is 3504 x 2336 = 8,185,344 and you would need PC monitor of roughly 1026 x 684 mm screen size or 49" across to see the original 8.2Mp picture without zooming in.

Canon 30D LCD monitor is 2.5" across or about 49 x 40mm. Number of pixels is 235,000 or about 537 x 438 = 235,206.

To figure out if 2.5" LCD screen can equal 8,185,344 resolution at 10x magnification one has to define what exactly is 10x magnification? I would think that 2x magnification for 8,2Mp picture size is actually 3504/2 x 2336/2 = or 8,185,344/4 = 2,046,336 pixels. Than 10x magnification is 8,185,344/100 = 81,853 pixels which our Canon 30D should show without any problems.

Unless I am wrong in defining what "zoomed picture" means in number of pixels, Canon 30D (or any other DSLR)should be more than capable for picture sharpenss testing?

Or I am not thinking right? Maybe it is not just number of pixels that defines the quality of the LCD screen.
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 4:25 PM   #4
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This is just a guess, but as a software engineer it's what I would do. The 30D (and others) are likely only loading a very small picture into memory in order to display it. The amount of time, memory, and processing power it would take to process and display an 8MP image on an embedded device is pretty significant (although the DIGIC processor is pretty good at being fast), so it's likely that in order to make the image appear faster (without interruptign the other functions of the processor) they simply use a scaled down version to start with. So when you're zooming in, you're actually zooming in on an image that's already been scaled to 'Low quality' in order to improve performance and usability. I don't know that this is what's going on, but it's my (somewhat) educated guess.
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Old Apr 13, 2006, 2:28 PM   #5
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You may have a good point. I was also thinking that this problem with LCD is not in number of pixels but in software. I am not in software but close enough to understand.
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