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Old Apr 24, 2006, 6:56 PM   #11
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Joe,
I find it interesting that you use TV and not AV. I would have thought that getting the highest shutter speed for an acceptable depth of field would be your utmost priority. But you shot much larger things that I do (people) and that is different than shooting images of wild animals.

CoachJerry,

I just checked, and I definitely use #2. The way you use that chart is that the text to the left of the "/" applies to the shutter button and the text to the right applies to the "*" button. Here are the meanings of those settings

0
- The shutter button controls auto focus and will figure out exposure if an exposure setting hasn't been locked into the camera for the next image (see the "*" key.)
- The * button figures out the exposure and locks that in so the next picture will use those settings. Once you press "*" the shutter button doesn't figure out exposure, it only focuses and takes the picture.

1
- The shutter button locks in the exposure when 1/2 pressed until you release the shutter.
- The * button starts the auto focus.

2
- The shutter button starts AF and exposure calculation when 1/2 pressed. Like what the camera does "normally".
- The "*" button stops AF from working. Or in their terms, locks the current focus until you release the * button.

3
- The Shutter button calculates exposure when 1/2 pressed. No auto focus.
- The * button starts AF, but doesn't do anything about exposure.

Does that explain it better?

Eric

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Old Apr 24, 2006, 7:29 PM   #12
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eric, et al,
Thanks for you help. FYI while exploring the issue I came across an excellent site that explains the custom function 4 in great detail. The site is

http://doug.kerr.home.att.net/pumpki...CF04_chart.pdf

It contains a chart as well as a dettailed description of what the chart shows.

It finally makes sense to me.

I have tried a few shots using setup 1 and was able to focus using the * button with my thumb. It will take a bit more practice before I am totally comfortable with it but I think it will be worth the effort.

Thanks again to everyone for your help.

Jerry
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Old Apr 25, 2006, 10:09 AM   #13
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Hi Eric,

For Sports photography you are right that both DOF and shutter are very important. Obviously you can control both very well under indoor lighting conditions.

Outdoors, it's a little give and take. I'd love to have frozen action in most cases with a niclely blurred background. However, I'm trying to take shots that will sell to parents. In my experiance a frozen shot of a child (due to faster shutter) with a slightly larger f/stop (ie... fence is focused more than I'd like). Sells better than slightly blurred arms, ball and bat with a out of focus fence

Also, I might be able to do a little about the sharp fence in CS2 post-processing with photo-kit. Much harder to play with motion blur.

Cheers,
Joe

If you're interested, take a look at my website. www.lacascio.com I just shot opening day (baseball) for a local town.


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Old Apr 25, 2006, 2:54 PM   #14
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jlacasci wrote:
Quote:
I'd love to have frozen action in most cases with a niclely blurred background. However, I'm trying to take shots that will sell to parents. In my experiance a frozen shot of a child (due to faster shutter) with a slightly larger f/stop (ie... fence is focused more than I'd like). Sells better than slightly blurred arms, ball and bat with a out of focus fence

I'm confused by this statement. You seem to be stating that frozen action = good which I agree. But you also seem to say you'll increase f-stop and incur an in-focus fence in order to achieve frozen action - that's what doesn't make sense. The larger aperture (smaller f-stop) gives you a higher shutter speed AND blurred background. increasing the aperture doesn't prevent motion blur - it prevents small DOF and focus mistakes (i.e the bat is in focus but the face is not) - is that what you meant?
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Old Apr 26, 2006, 11:35 AM   #15
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Hi John,

Let me clarify, after re-reading my post it does sound confusing.

In responding to the previous question by Eric in why I don't use AV andalmost exclusivley use TV (shutter priority) when shooting outdoor sports.Iwant to strike a balance between a fast shutter speed and not tooshallow a DOF so that the images are in focus. Depending on what I'm shootingI may set things up a little differently. My MarkII N focuses so quickly and accuratley that I _could_ get away with an f/1.8 on my 85mm and therefore very fast shutterspeed. Imight not use the f/1.8 on my 20D since I wouldn't get as many clearly focused shots with such a shallow DOF, the 20D doesn't compare to the Mark II N's capabilities.

Brief example: Since I might be pre-focusing on a 2nd base in expectations of a stolen base, camera is set to 1000/second f/stop at say f3.5. Catcher misses the ball, I turnquicklyfocusing oncatcher from the 1st base line,during this few seconds the sun pokes throughthe clouds and the f/stop closes down and I end up with a bigger DOF than I would normally want so the fence behind the play at home is in focus, but at least the play is focused and the action is frozen.

This is better to me than using AV mode, setting the f/stop and allowing the camera to pick shutter speed. IE... AV set to f/4 (a little DOF, not much mind you), clouds roll in and the shutter drops from saydown to 250 or so. Now the play at home may have blurred action due to shutter.

I'd rather maintain control of the shutter speed is all I'm saying ;-)

In reality, what I do is have my Mark II N with a 70-200 f/2.8, my 20D has a 400mm f/2.8 on it. For outside sports, both systems are set to TV mode, depending on lighting as fast of a shutter as I can with as small a DOF as I can and still get a high % of good, focused shots. Each camera is set slighly differently based on the camera's performance capabilities.

I hope this is a little clearer :-)
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Old Apr 26, 2006, 11:52 AM   #16
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yep - I'm with you now!
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Old Apr 26, 2006, 4:43 PM   #17
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Got it...

H
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