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Old Apr 23, 2006, 5:45 AM   #1
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Evidently I need to know more about RAW. My question is since RAW has to be converted (compressed) into another format, JPEG to be able to do anything with it why not just in JPEG to start with?
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Old Apr 23, 2006, 6:27 AM   #2
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Raw just saves the data from the imager, and the settings of the camera. When opening/editing the picture on the computer you can change all te settings and apply them on the original data, allowing finer control. The second advantage is thats there no data loss due to image compression (jpeg artifacts) because Raw uses lossless compression, while jpeg compression loses some of the original data.
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Old Apr 23, 2006, 12:52 PM   #3
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But to answer the other half of his question: Not starting with JPEG to begin with allows you the maximum ability to adjust the image before you begin to lose information via the compression process.


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Old Apr 23, 2006, 8:05 PM   #4
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You don't have to compressRAW imagesinto jpeg, you can alsosave it as a photoshop or tiff formatted file. RAW allowscolor balance, exposure and sharpness settings to be set after the photo has been shot. The reason it's called RAW is because the image processing is incomplete. You complete the processing in the RAW editor supplied by the camera vendor or in something like photoshop. RAW images also upsize very well compared to jpeg images.
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Old Apr 23, 2006, 11:55 PM   #5
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Something else to consider. Everytime you open and then save a jpg, it compresses again and again which increases the the chance that the image will look worse and worse.

I always convert from RAWA to TIFF then make all the edits that need to be done. Then to save time uploading, we save the final image as a jpg to send to the lab to have printed.

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Old Apr 27, 2006, 6:06 PM   #6
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I can save from RAW to TIFF in Canon zoombrowser Then do whatever i want to do in Adobe 6.0 ( which is what i have).
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Old Apr 28, 2006, 4:56 PM   #7
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Humbarger - you are about 3 years behind technology at this point. If you are doing any heavy shooting, look into Raw Essentials Premium, they are running a special right now. By far the most powerful and current RAW processor. Or, you can just update toPhotoshop 9(Cs2) and use their RAW processor. RSP will give you about 20% larger (more info saved) .jpgs. Does a great job of batching and a straightforward user guide.
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