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Old May 18, 2006, 8:40 AM   #11
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peripatetic wrote:
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I don't think you can say "use centre focus and recompose and don't worry about it", IMO "use centre focus and recompose and be careful" is much better advice.


If I may be so bold as to jump in here. I think the moral of the story that Peripatetic is trying to get across is this:

a DSLR is NOT a point and shoot. You need to understand the equipment and what is happening with exposure or focus or whatever. If you understand how it works, you can choose the method that will give you the best results in any given circumstance. There really is no getting away from having to learn the WHY and HOW of photography - if all you ever do is learn a single technique I gaurantee you'll encounter situations where the technique doesn't work. So, my advice is whenever someone gives you a technique for a situation spend time learning WHY that technique works/doesn't work so you can adapt when you get to a different situation and more importantly you can make the split second decision on WHICH technique will work in a situation before you miss the shot.
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Old May 18, 2006, 11:38 AM   #12
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If I see thousand bad lenses, I can say that you see a million bad photographers. Do not turn my words upside-down. About that particular Sigma lens, I've seen not more that two really bad, two average and much more good ones.

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Most of those are made by bad, or at least inexperienced, photographers and very few are ever backed up with pictures
There you go again, you are considering technique of making picture to complicated. If someone likes photography and invests couple $1000 and cannot learn basics in couple of hours than he is really bad. Again, if you cannot see the difference between the bad lens and bad picture, than you definitely have to learn to listen to others as well (eeek!).


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I'm not extrapolating from a single incident. Maybe that Sigma 10-20 is just cheap and nasty in general, but we've seen enough incidents (the majority IMO) where the equipment is blamed and it's the photographer that has the problem.
Again, you are showing that you are not all that informed and than you want to draw the conclusion just based on some of 'your research' on the internet. 'That' Sigma is not cheap ($400 for me is not cheap) and it is not 'nasty in general'. When I go shoping I buy A LENS a I do not buy photographer. I do not care about bad photographer (unless it is good looking :-))! So I collect information about the lens. Again I do not take anything for granted, I do not to believe what peripatetic say, but I do not ingore it either :lol:. Than, once I have the lens I know how to test it. Some people don't and they ask for help. Telling them that they are bad photographers and ignoring other possibility will not help. That is the point.

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In this particular case it was always likely that it was the lens that was a problem, but being stubborn and ornery I wouldn't want to admit that.
I know, but we have to go out of the loop sometimes ...

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:-)But I do think it's a good idea to learn to do proper lens tests so that when you do get a bad one you can demonstrate it beyond any doubt. :blah:
I am ready to learn something from you: but again, in this case it was obvious

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Really? Even if we do, and many don't, often it won't be on peoples' mind when taking photos, and there are many posts complaining about OOF pictures when using that method. Usually it's blamed on the lens.
I take the point. I will say again: PEOPLE - do not listen to me! If you do not know how, read, ask and than do what YOU think is the best at the end! Eventually we will learn from you one day.

BTW, I never complained about ANY of my lenses even though they are not perfect. But is there one? :|

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OK good for you, I have had many,
OK bad for you :-)! Just kdng! I am accepting other opinions and methods. I am not recommending anything, I am just saying that for casual shooting using center AF is good! If anyone thinks that pressing one button and rotating a dial will always make his picture better ... let it be!

When we want to be creative and want to play with those 101 buttons, then why not? No bad pictures anymore! YEPEEEE!! :G
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Old May 18, 2006, 12:09 PM   #13
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And one more thing about us photographers and our so much loved (mostly) DSLR cameras! Why do we buy DSLR and not P&S? Because we like to carry 3-4 kilos with us and our DSLR looks much 'cooler' than that (dumb) P&S?

Anybody here with DSLR ever used (or god forbidowned) P&S camera?

Anyoneever used film SLR without AF and made good shot? Yeah, there is that thing called viewfinder where you usually can see if your picture is sharp or not.

If our DSLR is not P&S, why are we using AF at all? That sounds so P&S to me. Lets switchto MF and use our eyes! Why we need IS? Again, it is so P&S. Real photographer knows how to hold that 2ft long baby steady! RRRRRRR!

My point is: as much as we do not want to admit, we like the convenience of modern technology. I would love to have camera that would do everything for me (or whenever I want) so I can thinkg about composition, my subject, good light and other elements of good photography. I like to take a LOT of photographs (most of them are crap), and I do not have to much time - have to work. So I am always readay to compromise.

So using only one AF point is just more conveniet (faster). For total control, turn off Av, Tv, A, P, AF, IS ,WB ... and turn on M and MF. Or just go back to film ... again ... :idea:
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Old May 18, 2006, 12:17 PM   #14
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Feel better now?
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Old May 18, 2006, 1:40 PM   #15
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Well ... about the same as before, thanks for asking! I appologize if I spoiled this topic in any way!
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Old May 19, 2006, 11:56 AM   #16
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Those discussions, even though we may disagree sometimes, may get you thinking more about some things you are doing to see if you can do them better.

I will do more tests on this topic, not to show who is right or wrong. I've made couple of family shots yesterday, this time using dial to select the AF point. Some of them turned not so sharp?! I have steady hand ... but ...

I will do more tests, this time with tripod. Again, it will all depend on the situation, but I am talking of one of them: family pictures, like group of people.

When we have two or three person at the distance of 5-10 m and using 50-70mm focal length, the difference between the distance measured by center or any other AF point will not be of any significance. That is what camera in fact is doing: measuring the distance. How accurate the camera is in doing so, we can test buy marking the lens position and AF couple of the times at the same spot and distance. Good camera and good lens will show minimal inconsistence.

I was thinking of the other aspect and that is when, for example, left-most AF point is used for focusing lens sharpness, even though not significant, is still not as good as at the center. All the focusing is done at the highest aperture (say 2_8 so that sharpness difference may be even worse. Can that affect focusing accuracy (or speed) of the camera? I am not sure, but will do some more testing and post.

If anybody knows about some good link for reading on this topic on internet, maybe it can shown it here?

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Old May 28, 2006, 7:48 AM   #17
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You can select the center point as your primary focusing point and you should do that.* Some of your shots look like action, ie, movement, shots.* Where you using the Servo mode?A lot of comments made about the d200 and I won't go into the issue very much, except to say that I tried one and returned it for the 30D.* It focused poorly in low light (hunted) and the noise was unbearable.* Not to mention it was awkward to use with buttons and dials stuck all over the camera.* With the 30D I can turn the back dial with my thumb and change exposure instead of having to hold some button and turn a dial while holding my mouth a certain way.* How it gets a higher rating than the 30D is beyond me.* I will say this for it, I do like its non matte focusing screen and the fact that the viewfinder is slighly magnified (20%) and wish Canon would do this.**
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