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Old Jun 28, 2006, 11:01 AM   #11
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i do use a UV filter, but i've used that on every SLR lensi've ever owned, and it's never caused ISO settings to change.

i'm using the evaluative metering, which should (if i understand it correctly) meter on the center of the image, but also include in the exposure calculation the average illumination of the entire image... i'll have to double check, but i don't believe i'm using any exposure compensation. my lenses have maximum apertures of 3.5 for my 24-135, and 4.5-5.6 for my 80-400 - pretty standard stuff - andthe exposure readings in the viewfinder show that the lenses are openingup like they're supposed to,so it's unlikely there's a problem there.

i shoot at all times of day, but often between 10AM and 7PM. subjects lately have been floral (i'm one of the staff photographers for a local botanical garden), critters, andscenery. most of the flower stuff has, unfortunately, been shot on cloudy days, and often with darker backgrounds - i can understand the need for higher ISO under those conditions. what i have a problem with is having to shoot at ISO 800 to get shutter speeds fast enough to freeze birds' wings, even without a polarizer, in broad daylight at f5.6-f7.1. it seems to me that in bright light, i should be able to get those speeds (1/1000-1/1300) at no more than ISO 400, which is why i'm wondering if there's something out of whack with the camera, and if so, what it might be.
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 11:07 AM   #12
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squirl033 wrote:
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... in broad daylight at f5.6-f7.1. it seems to me that in bright light, i should be able to get those speeds (1/1000-1/1300) at no more than ISO 400, which is why i'm wondering if there's something out of whack with the camera, and if so, what it might be.
That's where I started from as well: http://www.pbase.com/nhl/image/56322750&exif=Y

-> 1/500s f/16.0 at 600.0mm iso400, early morning... (handheld)
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 3:37 PM   #13
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NHL wrote:
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squirl033 wrote:
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... in broad daylight at f5.6-f7.1. it seems to me that in bright light, i should be able to get those speeds (1/1000-1/1300) at no more than ISO 400, which is why i'm wondering if there's something out of whack with the camera, and if so, what it might be.
That's where I started from as well: http://www.pbase.com/nhl/image/56322750&exif=Y

-> 1/500s f/16.0 at 600.0mm iso400, early morning... (handheld)

that's my point... to get f16 at 1/500 in that light, i'd be using much higher ISO settings, not 400! here are someexamples, all shot with my 80-400 with no polarizer...

this was shotabout half an hour before sundown, 1/500, f5.6, ISO 640...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...IMG_2990sm.jpg

this one was taken at 3PM on a bright sunny day, 1/800, f8, ISO 800. i MIGHT have been able to hold 1/500 at f16, but not at ISO 400!

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...IMG_4597sm.jpg

and this one was shot in bright shade (sunreflecting offsnow) in the mountains, and i still only got 1/250 @ f8using ISO 800...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...IMG_5089sm.jpg

here's another one, shot in hazy sun in early evening (sundown here in summer is after 9PM)... still only 1/400 @ f8, even at ISO 800...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...IMG_4054sm.jpg

it's not like the high ISO is screwing up my photos, though there is sometimes noticeable (but not objectionable) noise in the shadowy spots - it's just that i feel like i should have been able to get these same shots at ISO 200-400 under the conditions. i could see if i were trying to shoot at 1/1000 and f22 on a cloudy day, but these were all taken in good light, at relatively wide apertures, and still only yielded moderate (at best!) shutter speeds...




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Old Jun 28, 2006, 3:57 PM   #14
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squirl033

I have no comment on the first image, but the next two could use a -1 EV compensation which might put you @ ISO400 since the subject and their background are predominently dark...
-> A reflective meter and a handheld incidence meter sometime does not jive! :idea:
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 4:05 PM   #15
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What do you get when you try to shoot a white swan for example?
(much smaller ISO shouldn't it?)
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 8:12 PM   #16
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I've not read every line in this topic, but have you tried shooting the same scene with 2 different bodies, (camera bodies:blah? If you don't have another body, how about a friend whose body you can use? Can you go to a camera shop and try another 30D side by side?
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 10:54 PM   #17
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no white swans anywhere around here...

only have the one body, and unfortunately none of my friends are into photography. i suppose i could try to borrow or rent one to compare... or maybe take mine to a camera shop to compare readings...
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Old Jun 29, 2006, 6:22 AM   #18
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squirl033 wrote:
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no white swans anywhere around here...
The reason I asked was almost all the birds shots you posted seems predominently black, and the darker water does not help the metering either (i.e. the camera think it's not bright enough because it's a reflectance meter with respect to neitral grey only)

This is what I'm talking about: http://www.pbase.com/nhl/image/61132369/original
-> 1/4000s f/9.5 at 220.0mm iso400 in normal daylight


Just an example on your images: on #2 shot (the legs) and #3 (the white feather) could use some faster speed (or smaller aperture) to bring the details back on those areas...
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Old Jun 29, 2006, 6:42 AM   #19
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NHL - is there any way of getting the EV value of the metering of a scene from the camera?

I don't use an external meter, just the in-camera meter, but all external meters I have seen give that as the primary value.

Squirl - can you look at a scene, use the spot meter and meter off different areas with different reflectance and use exposure lock and shoot and post the different shots for us?


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Old Jun 29, 2006, 6:54 AM   #20
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peripatetic wrote:
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NHL - is there any way of getting the EV value of the metering of a scene from the camera?
I've never try this: http://expodisc.com/

-> but it's made just like the domes on many of my incidence meters :lol: :-) :G
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