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Old Jul 21, 2006, 10:09 PM   #1
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How do I set the exposure level in manual mode. I am a newbie to manual mode. It's set all the way to the left. I have a Canon Rebel XT.:G
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Old Jul 21, 2006, 11:11 PM   #2
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you don't. with manual mode you have complete control for over/under exposure by adjusting shutter speed or aperature.

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Old Jul 21, 2006, 11:30 PM   #3
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But if you want to follow the "suggested" exposure, just adjust either the aperture or shutter until the "bar" at the exposure meter is at the center.

Note, that you need to adjust the aperture by keeping your finger on the Av button and turn the wheel next the shutter.
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Old Jul 25, 2006, 11:31 PM   #4
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Bar to the right of center? Overexposed.

-Set ISO Lower, Increase Shutter Speed, Decrease Aperature (higher f)



Bar to the left of center? Underexposed.

-Set ISO Higher, Decrease Shutter Speed, Increase Aperature (lower f)



Or any combination of those three elements. Higer ISO means a grainy-er image, so I would suggest you fix the other two first.
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Old Jul 26, 2006, 8:46 AM   #5
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fireserphant wrote:
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Bar to the right of center? Overexposed.

-Set ISO Lower, Increase Shutter Speed, Decrease Aperature (higher f)



Bar to the left of center? Underexposed.

-Set ISO Higher, Decrease Shutter Speed, Increase Aperature (lower f)



Or any combination of those three elements. Higer ISO means a grainy-er image, so I would suggest you fix the other two first.
Some good advice. I want to add an important point though: you really want to practice and understand what ISO, aperture and shutter speed do to images. People shoot manual because they want to control all 3 of those aspects. So, in the example above the photgrapher should have some idea of why they want to change shutter speed as opposed to aperature.

For instance, ISO 100, F2.8 and 1/1000 will produce the exact same exposure as ISO 100, f11, 1/60

When shooting in manual mode, the photographer needs to know what the affect of those two different settings will have on the final result. While both settings will produce the same exposure one setting could completely ruin your shot in a given situation and could be the best setting in another situation. Manual mode is a great way to experiment and learn how aperture affects depth-of-field and shutter speed affects motion - but the key is to practice and learn so when you're taking a shot that counts and using manual, you'll know the difference between the above two settings and know which one is right for that particular shot
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