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Old Aug 20, 2006, 4:47 PM   #1
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I have my daughter running around, with me practicing shooting her with my camera.

So, trying to get the best motion shots possible, I'm experimenting with the ISO settings. In AI Servo mode, I can make the ISO 1600 max. Those shots seem very bright (in full sun and manually lowering the apeture setting). As I lower the ISO setting to 800, more color comes into the shot. Is that what is meant by over exposed?

So it seems like, in full sunlight, 800 (with the apeture set to it's lowest possible setting)is fine. How can I use the histogram to make the color, lighting, etc, better? And, how will I know when to use 800 vs 1600? And lastly, I've seen mention to ISO 3200, where is that setting?

thx
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Old Aug 20, 2006, 7:21 PM   #2
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What camera are you using? If you can use a lower ISO setting, you'll get less noisey pictures.

ISO is an important parameter, as are f-stop (how big an opening is the lens providing) and shutter speed (how long is the shutter open).

Some cameras don't let you select these options. If yours doesn't, consider using the "Sports" mode for shots of the little ankle biter. Raising kids isn't a sport, but trying to photograph them can be :-)

There are lots of sites that will help you understand how to get good pictures of your daughter. Take a lot of pictures... practice, practice, pracice. You're going to love the photos you take now, especially when you're as old as me :roll:
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Old Aug 21, 2006, 8:49 AM   #3
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kc571 wrote:
Quote:
In AI Servo mode, I can make the ISO 1600 max. Those shots seem very bright (in full sun and manually lowering the apeture setting). As I lower the ISO setting to 800, more color comes into the shot. Is that what is meant by over exposed?

So it seems like, in full sunlight, 800 (with the apeture set to it's lowest possible setting)is fine. How can I use the histogram to make the color, lighting, etc, better? And, how will I know when to use 800 vs 1600? And lastly, I've seen mention to ISO 3200, where is that setting?

thx
OK, a couple items here. First, on a sunny day, ISO 800 or 1600 is probably too much. In general, ISO should be the last of the 3 exposure variables (ISO,aperture,shutter speed) that you change.

While you are getting the hang of action shooting I strongly recommend shooting aperture priority mode first. First of all, change the cameras metering mode to center-weighted - don't use evaluative - you want to meter for your subject not the background.

Since you have only a single subject, select an aperture of around f4-f5.6 and set ISO at 100. half press the shutter to see what shutter speed the camera is going to give you. Is it 1/500 or faster? If so, leave the ISO at 100. If the shutter speed is too slow, change your ISO until your shutter speed reaches 1/500. That's a very easy way to start taking action shots. On a sunny day you shouldn't go above ISO 400 - probably stay at 200. And, by the way, having too much shutter speed is not an issue as long as you don't hit the max for your camera (usually 1/4000 or 1/8000 on a DSLR).

2nd question - using the histogram. Set up your camera to display the histogram after each shot. When you do that you can view 2 things -

1st - the picture itself will 'flash' in areas that are overexposed - so you'll be drawn to areas where highlights are blown. Second you'll see the histogram itself. Here's a good write-up on understanding histograms:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...stograms.shtml

But in general for this type of shot you want a reasonably centered histogram - you definitely don't want one shifted hard toward either end.

In tricky lighting you may end up under or over-exposing your main subject - this is where you use Exposure Compensation - in AV mode this will have the affect of increasing or decreasing shutter speed to override the camera's metering for the situation. You'll have this situation when there are shadows, when there is very dark (think navy or black) clothing or very light (think white) on your subject. But, the histogram will tell you if you need to use EC.

I would also recommend you do some reading on exposure and depth of field. The luminous landscape site above has some great articles on it. You are going to need to understand these principles if you're going to do action shots. It really is unavoidable. While the camera is smart enough to do the focusing for you, proper exposure and DOF for a given shot is entirely up to you - and the two are often at odds.


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