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Old Aug 23, 2006, 12:28 PM   #1
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I just bought a Canon 30D. I am in the process of getting the filters for it along with lenses. I had problems with vignetting on my last camera andhad to get step rings. So now Ihave a few ?'s:

1. Does anyone know if there are problems with the 30d and needing step up rings for filters?

2. Do I need step up rings with the 30d?

3. What filters are recommended for everyday use and protection of my lenses? UV? I used HOYA S-HMC on my last camera, but infortunately it was only 49mm.

4. Do I need a protectionfilter for all of my lenses?



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Old Aug 25, 2006, 1:04 AM   #2
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The filters come in 'normal' and 'thin' in construction
-> The thin filters usually do not have front thread (< 3mm) and are designed so that that they do not vignette @ the wide setting such as the 49mm on the Minolta's camera.

The vignetting is not particular to a camera, but is related more to the lens used: for example 'digital' only lenses tend to vignette more than a full-frame lens since only the center part of the full-frame lens is used for the image (i.e. the vignetting part are cropped out by the 1.6x factor)
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 3:08 AM   #3
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Once again, it depends very much on the lens whether a filter is a good idea.

I can't use the expensive "ultra-thin" & "pro" Hoya filters that I got for my 2 particular lenses because they severely degrade image quality.

On the 17-85 my experience is that it caused severe vignetting at 17mm, and the only time I've ever noticed CA on that lens is when I had the filter on.

On my 70-300 DO the filter causes and incredible degradation in image quality. Turns a £1000 lens into a piece of junk. No doubt something to do with the diffractive optics.

So those 2x £40 filters were a big waste of money.

My Sigma 12-24 has a curved front element, sousing a filter is out there too.

I thought about whether I had ever scratched or damaged a lens filter in my 15 years of using a 35mm film SLR and I realised I never had.

So I don't use filters now at all, but I always use lens hoods to protect the front element. Since I stopped using filters I haven't damaged the lens either, and frankly don't expect to.


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Old Aug 25, 2006, 6:28 AM   #4
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Another consideration is whether or not you will be able to use a hood with the strp up ring. I bought a 77~82mm step up ring and found that I could not use the hood.
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Old Aug 25, 2006, 6:51 PM   #5
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IMO it's not just a matter of lenses
It depends on where you shoot:
1. In the Carribean or tropical countries, the salt spray just stick on everything!
2. Going out from an air conditioned room (or vehicles) will immediately condensed the lenses

-> The salt spray are just not water vapor, but the sticky sands, salts and hard dirt also come with it an will stick on all optical surfaces - You have to wipe this junk off constantly and it just become a ritual before every shots

I have replaced many polarizers this way already, a must for water/sky shots (and KR1.5/3 filters) because of scratches on them which will otherwise be on the lenses instead... You just do whatever is right, and my pictures came out better because of it - I have yet to take a carribean landscape without a filter on... :?

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Old Jun 3, 2007, 8:07 AM   #6
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Thanks for the info guys. I have been in and out of the country since this last post, so this is why I am so late replying. I wish I would have taken my camera everytime, but space limited me.

I have always been too scared to take my 30d to the beach for fear of salt and sand muck getting inside or on it. But I guess you are right, keep a filter on it and it will be ok.

Is there anywhere else I should be worried about keeping the beach muck off?
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Old Jun 3, 2007, 9:14 AM   #7
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If you are worried about all the "muck", and I would be, you can use a large zip loc bag and only take the camera out of it when you are ready to shoot....
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