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Old Aug 28, 2006, 11:41 PM   #11
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I think that John's list of equipment is right on. That lens mix seems reasonable, the camera bodies should work well (the 10D might be a bit low resolution for some really big prints, if they want them, but it's a capable camera) and the flash, soft box/defuser, and flash bracket are right on.

Jacks's point is exactly my point.
If you just want to get good shots at a wedding, and there is already a "pro" there, then go right ahead and have fun taking wedding photos. We'll answer general questions just like they were any other question.

If they do not have a "pro" there being paid for it, and want you to produce the "quality" shots, then watch out. You have no idea what you are getting into.

My point (and Jack's as well) is that if you are the only photographer there, then they have expectations. Very high ones (even if they don't say they do.)

For example:
This is a once in a lifetime event, you have to treat it as such. There are shots that you *must* get, and they only happen once. The picture of the first kiss, the ring being put on the finger, the bride walking down the aisle. If you aren't ready for them, if you don't know your equipment well enough and have a setting wrong, if your battery dies and you aren't fast at replacing it, if you are out of place when it happens…. Then you don't get the shot. And missing those shots is unacceptable. PERIOD.

You need a backup of everything. It is not acceptable to have your camera die. Or a lens. Or your flash batteries.

You need to be very good at exposure. You have to get the details in the white dress the bride wears, while still getting detail in the black tux that the groom wears. This is one of the hardest situations to photograph.

You can't be late. You have know how to get there,

You have to get pictures of the important people. You should really go the rehearsal and talk to people in both families. Learn who the important people are… one might be a long lost friend from college. And while you are there, you need to scout out where you're going to get the set shots.

Oh, and you have to manage people. You have to be good at politely telling people where they need to be and when for the set shots, while also not getting in the way or making it feel like you are "imposing" yourself on the event. People should not be aware of you, while at the same time you have to get where you need to be ahead of time so you are ready for those special shots.

You getting my point? You can't just say "I want to know about taking wedding pictures" without telling is what is expected of you. Are you just "taking some pictures" (you're a guest with a camera) or are you "responsible for getting the wedding pictures" (the bride & groom are expecting you to take the place of the "professional" photographer at the wedding.) Even if you aren't being paid, the expectations are going to be very high if you are "the wedding photographer".

That is why is matters if you are being paid or not.

Did I make myself clear?

Eric

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Old Aug 29, 2006, 7:20 AM   #12
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Thanks Eric. That was well explained and detailed. Now I got the difference. I'm not planning to be an official photographer now. But I got the points to be that, regarding backups, not missing the crucial scene etc. But your points are giving me much help to start with.
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Old Aug 29, 2006, 7:36 AM   #13
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John,

Thanks for the advice on backups.



Jacks,

As I mentioned, I don't want to be the official photographer at the moment.
But I'm collecting info's & advice from expert on both.


AlpineMan,


Thanks for the advice.


Can someone share me a link for good wedding photographs, to get an idea?
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Old Aug 30, 2006, 3:24 PM   #14
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Hi Glass,

klick Steves Forums > Digital SLR Cameras > Canon Lenses > First wedding rebel XT

Ciao and good luck, Wolfie:-)
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Old Aug 31, 2006, 8:51 AM   #15
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Oh, thanks wolfie.

Thanks for the link, that was informative.

Can someone tell me if, Canon 50mm 1.8 and high ISO 800/1600 enough for indoor shots?

Can I achieve pictures without blur at this settings? Has any one tried? Or should I go for some other lens if I don't want to use flash at all?
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Old Aug 31, 2006, 9:58 AM   #16
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This was shot with that lens in light worse than most indoor venues. It's sharp, but the depth of field is so shallow that only half the pair of glasses are in focus, so it's not really practical for something like a wedding except for certain posed shots. You really need a flash, preferably an external one that is a long way off the axis of the lens.
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Old Aug 31, 2006, 10:15 AM   #17
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jacks wrote:
Quote:
You really need a flash, preferably an external one that is a long way off the axis of the lens.
Hi there,

flash would be surely better, but - in my experience - your`e most often not allowed to use flashguns through the ceremony.

Glass, have a look at these 2 theater productions at my children's school. The 05 pictures "Death on the Nile" were taken with the 1,8 50 I, the 06 pictures "Les Miserables" with the 2,8 24-70 Sigma EX (both with EOS 10D). I naturally have far more pics of these events (and i.m.h.o. better ones) but the kids selected these. Nevertheless, these pics should give you an impression of real low light, high ISO (1600 & 3200)photography with lenses similar to yours and with a far less sophisticated camera. (A bit of PS and Neat Image included)
http://www.gmm.musin.de/tet/nil/bilder.html
Ciao, Wolfie
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Old Sep 1, 2006, 6:53 AM   #18
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jacks,

That's a nice picture.

I understand that you've taken at ISO400 to get 1/60sec.
I'm sure with 1600 ISO, you should be getting a better shutter speed.
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Old Sep 1, 2006, 6:56 AM   #19
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Wolfie,

Thanks for the samples.
I'm getting kind of confident now, without flash.

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