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Old Sep 13, 2006, 8:38 AM   #1
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I have the following lenses but I wonder what are the ideal ones to use for period costumes on a real person or group of people?

I have a Canon D60 with the following lenses

16-35 f2.8L, 100mm f/1.8 macro and 70-200 f/2.8 usm

2 ETFL 550ex flash guns, 1 wirelesscontrol for guns

Will also those gold/silver reflectors help or not necessary?

Many thanks

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Old Sep 14, 2006, 4:05 AM   #2
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Perhaps I need to tease the experts for a reply. Will this do? :-)
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Old Sep 14, 2006, 7:12 AM   #3
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All are okay.

Obviously the 100 mm wouldbe used mostly for portraits or close ups. The other two could be used for portraits and groups. You're missing a pretty big part of the range by not having a 24 - 70 zoom. The quality of all the lenses is very high. Based on the equipment you listed, it seems as though you have just brought someone's old canon camera and lens set up. I'm basing this on the fact that you included a D60 in the list. I'm also assuming that if you had been using the D60 when it first came out you'd probably know the answers to your question. The biggest variable in all of this will be your ability to frame and take the appropriate shots.

You didn't mention if this would be a play or studio setting in which you plan on taking photos. This wil allow the experts to provide better answers.
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Old Sep 14, 2006, 4:57 PM   #4
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Hi

"You're missing a pretty big part of the range by not having a 24 - 70 zoom"

Yes, I was wondering about this bit as this is the first time I was asked to do period costumes on period houses so I never bought this range and wasn't sure which camera to buy. I wanted to invest in the best lens I can afford.

"it seems as though you have just brought someone's old canon camera.."

I bought the D60as new many years ago so yes you are right, I should know the answer but just wasn't sure which one to buy for this range.

"You didn't mention if this would be a play or studio setting in which you plan on taking photos. This wil allow the experts to provide better answers."

It mostly willbe inside a period house, most of these will be 17th/18th century, Georgian period. There will be dancers too doing the 18th Century dances but I can take care of the movements with flash guns.

Thanks again. :lol:

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Old Sep 14, 2006, 7:05 PM   #5
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Did you get a "kit lens" with the D60? Otherwise, I think you will really miss having anything in the 24 - 70 range. There are several options in this range, some of them are other brands. I like the 28 - 135 IS, 24 - 85 both Canons and the 24 - 70 Sigma 2.8 EX as potential options for filling the 24 - 70 void. I think the color balance of the D60 will really make the costumes stand out. Depending on the amount of available lightyou cando most of the photos without a flash if you go with the Sigma EX 2.8. The rest of your lens collection is very fast and shouldn't require a flash either if it's during the day. If you get a chance to do some practice shots before the event it would be nice.
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Old Sep 15, 2006, 11:02 AM   #6
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The camera was by itself when I brought it.

The 24-70 f/2.8 looks ideal, but the 28-135 IS f3.5 looks more affordable and the "IS" guarantees sharp pictures.



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Old Sep 16, 2006, 5:33 AM   #7
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reflectors can reflect either the available light or you can use it for bounce flash. The silver gives off crisp/hard contrast and the gold gives a warming tone (popular for portraits). However, it's best if you can have a second person holding it.

In th end, I think you can get by without them.
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Old Sep 16, 2006, 8:23 AM   #8
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I think you're going to find the 16-35mm is the lens you will use most of the time inside these houses. Most of the rooms in these older types of houses were pretty small and to be able to tell the story with these portraits you will need to include some of the furniture, wall hangings and such and you will need that 16mm. For tight head shots your 100mm or the 70-200mm should do just fine. I would suggest you invest in a strobaframe and off camera cord for you flash to get it high above your lens and set if for fill light, and also a lumiquest softbox for both flashes to soften the flash. If you can get some natrual light from windows into the room without being too harsh this will be even better than flash for still portraits, and this is where a reflector might be handy. Yes your are missing something not having the 24-70mm, but in this case I think you can get by without it in these types of homes, may have to zoom with your feet with the 16-35, but that is free.
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Old Sep 16, 2006, 7:07 PM   #9
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Thanks for the professional advice, I must look into this stroboframe but definitely get the softbox. I am sure the two flash guns controlled remotely by the wireless on the camera will remove the dark shadows from behind - one at the front or side and one arrear.
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Old Sep 16, 2006, 7:51 PM   #10
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If you have just two lights, you should have one directly behind the camera up high and the main light off to one side. The light behind you will eliminate most of the harsh shadows. If you have strong widow light you can get by with on flash or use a reflector and go without any.
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