Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Canon Lenses

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 25, 2007, 8:48 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 734
Default

here another one up close.


Attached Images
 
coldshot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 25, 2007, 8:55 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 734
Default

Here is a portrait shot of a family's daughter birthday party next door when I was invited to attend.

What else can you ask for in a walkaround lens?

Your next lens forkids sports should be 70-300 or you can skip it and save some more money to get something in the 400mm, that's my next lens, I'm getting tired of the 70-300 range now.



Attached Images
 
coldshot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 26, 2007, 1:49 AM   #13
Super Moderator
 
peripatetic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,599
Default

I must disagree with coldshot.

Why on earth restrict yourself to 28*1.6=46mm equivalent focal length as your widest angle? That's really not a decent enough wide angle for most people.

If you must get a superzoom (with all the optical compromises it entails) then at least go for one of the 18-200 digital zooms.
peripatetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 26, 2007, 7:38 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 734
Default

peripatetic wrote:
Quote:
I must disagree with coldshot.

Why on earth restrict yourself to 28*1.6=46mm equivalent focal length as your widest angle? That's really not a decent enough wide angle for most people.

If you must get a superzoom (with all the optical compromises it entails) then at least go for one of the 18-200 digital zooms.
Why not? However when you buy a new camera you need to buy with a lens, you have to check for availibility, some vendors don't have it, you don't want to buy a camera in one place and the lens at the other, another thing is you can leave that wide end open maybe later you want to buy a wide angleperhaps a fast lens 2.8 better. I suggested the 28-200mm because I'm using it and post some pictures for the posters to see what they can expect in that lens, I can't suggest something that I don't have. If you have the 18-200mmpost somepictures, it's a good alternativefor a new camera buyertobuyat the same vendor to replace the kit lens.
coldshot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 26, 2007, 12:01 PM   #15
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I'd have to side with peripatetic on this one.

28mm is just too long for many uses on a DSLR.

My favorite walk around for my Maxxum 5D is a Minolta 24-85mm f/3.5=4.5.

This is a compromise type lens for me. It's focal range is a bit more ambitious (from wide to long) than some lens designs, and it's a stop dimmer on average than a higher quality (and heavier) f/2.8 zoom. But, optical quality is still better than expected for a lens that has this much range from wide to long.

I end up with this one on my camera most often as my normal "walk around", because it starts out a bit wider and reaches a bit longer than the typical 28-70ish zooms that are popular on 35mm SLR models without compromising optical quality too much for what I'd use the images for.

But, even though it starts out at a wider 24mm, that's often not quite wide enough for indoors when I'm trying to get photos of friends and family in rooms indoors.

You can only back up so much. ;-) Now, sure, I try to get by using a 28mm f/2 indoors a lot, and sometimes that works out well. But, if I'm trying to get a room full of people in a photo, that can be an entirely different story.

That's when I'll reach in my bag and grab something like my Tamron SP 20-40mm, since it at least gives me the same angle of view I'd have using a lens starting out at around 30mm on a 35mm camera. Or, if I need something even wider, I've got my "kit" lens, too. Some people may want even wider lenses (starting out at 10 or 12mm). Any choice is a compromise.

The same thing can apply for outdoors... you may not be able to back up far enough to get that house you want in the photo, or that tree you think looks great, and more.

So, why pick a lens starting out at 28mm, when there are other choices available?

You've already expressed an interest in a longer lens for sports use. So, we're trying to figure out what's good for the wider end.

Any lens choice is a compromise (size, weight, cost, focal range, sharpess at wider apertures, sharpness at smaller apertures, distortion, resistance to flare, Autofocus Speed, color, contrast and more).

So, what do users think of the Sigma 28-200? Coldshot seems to like it. But, if you look at the user opinion surveys around, except for one Vivitar lens that rates worse, this Sigma is generally considered to be the poorest quality lens you can buy from any manufacturer that makes lenses in Canon EF Lens mount for use on a DSLR with an APS-C size sensor.

That's user opinions from people that have used it.

Want to see the opinion surveys?

Go to this page:

http://www.photozone.de/8Reviews/index.html

Then, scroll all the way down to the bottom to the "User Opinion Surveys" section. Then, click on "Canon EOS Lenses" in that section. On the next page, you'll see a "Start Query Button" Leave everything else at defaults and click on it to see all lenses will user opinions for Canon EF mount.

This is what you'll find 7 different users thought of of it when used on a DSLR with an APS-C sensor. Only one lens that I can find in the entire database rates as poorer quality by users (a longer Vivitar zoom).

There is also an entry with more user opinions (28 ) for it shown without a category specific to DSLR models (so, this is more likely a mixture of film and DSLR users that have tried it, since some of the DSLR specific categories were not added until later). It's still rates poor across the board.

So, from my perspective, it's rated as bad as it gets for a lens of it's type by users, and it's not really wide enough for some uses, and you want a lens more suitable for sports than something like this one would be.

Now, does coldshot have the same lens? Maybe not. The newer lenses have better coatings, so they may not be as bad for things like flare and more in harsher lighting. If you don't use the zoom extremes, stay in lighting that's not as harsh, stop down the aperture to where the lens is sharpest, etc., you may get great photos from one in the right conditions. But, given it's starting focal length, especially with the optical quality reported by users of it, I'd find a different choice if I were going to spend that much money on a DSLR kit.


Attached Images
 
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:24 AM.