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Old Apr 7, 2007, 2:54 PM   #1
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I have just purchased a 70-200 2.8L Canon.... Any suggestions on protecting the lens while it is in use.... 77mm I believe....
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Old Apr 7, 2007, 3:48 PM   #2
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There are two camps in this issue ... those who swear by something like a UV or Skylight filter for protection, and those who do not.

With almost 50 years experience in all venues of photography, I fall into the second camp — with some modification:

I rarely use a so-called lens protector except in inclimate (wet or very dusty, for example) weather. The more glass you put in front of the lens the greater the potential degredation (lens flare, etc.).

An example is a driving rain where I use a large Baggie to cover my camera , with themounted filterpoking through a tight hole in the plastic.

So, while I do have quality, coated UV filters for all my lenses, they are used only when the conditions are potentially damaging to my lens.

Of course, I do use a polarizer quite often, as well as some other specialized filters (ND400 for IR, for example) when needed.

On edit, what I DO use for protection on my zooms and longer lens are lens hoods of both the plastic and rubber varieties.
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Old Apr 7, 2007, 11:12 PM   #3
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Thank you very much....
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Old Apr 8, 2007, 1:39 AM   #4
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Yeah, this question comes up every 2-3 weeks, so if you look back you will find plenty of threads about this.

Once again it all depends on you, how careful you are with your lenses, what environment you work in.

My basic position is that I don't use filters, depending on the lens even expensive "protective" filters can degrade image quality. If you do decide to use them then make sure you match the quality of the filter to the quality of the lens. With a cheap lens most filters would be fine, but do you really want to put a $20 piece of plastic in front of a $1500 lens? You will probably be very disappointed in the quality of the photos if you do.

And since digital I don't even use a polariser.

If I were going into a specific environment where I was worried about corrosive liquids (like sea water perhaps) hitting the front lens element then I would consider a filter.



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Old Apr 8, 2007, 1:15 PM   #5
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hgernhardtjr wrote:
Quote:
There are two camps in this issue ... those who swear by something like a UV or Skylight filter for protection, and those who do not.

With almost 50 years experience in all venues of photography, I fall into the second camp — with some modification:

I rarely use a so-called lens protector except in inclimate (wet or very dusty, for example) weather. The more glass you put in front of the lens the greater the potential degredation (lens flare, etc.).

An example is a driving rain where I use a large Baggie to cover my camera , with themounted filterpoking through a tight hole in the plastic.

So, while I do have quality, coated UV filters for all my lenses, they are used only when the conditions are potentially damaging to my lens.

Of course, I do use a polarizer quite often, as well as some other specialized filters (ND400 for IR, for example) when needed.

On edit, what I DO use for protection on my zooms and longer lens are lens hoods of both the plastic and rubber varieties.
Amen, With the exceptiom of the rubber varity lens hood. They provide no protection if they are colapsable. Always lens makers specifically designed hood.
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Old Apr 8, 2007, 1:15 PM   #6
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I have to agree with the above posts, with some potential additions. I tend to use a UV filter outdoors much more often than indoors. My objective being to protect the lense as I deem necessary.

When I do choose to usa UV protector, I use a good one such as ingh Ray, B&w or Hoya These are ated and are as good as it gets. Lesser one increase the potential for problem when you add another layere ogflass to your camerlense.
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