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Old May 13, 2007, 1:30 PM   #1
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hi, PLEASE see the previous posts i made so i dont ahve to type up 3 pages of my situation http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=87

I was making a package on amazon, here is what im looking at.

Canon Digital Rebel XT 8MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only - Black) - Canon
In Stock $499.99[/b]
[/b] Canon NB-2LH Rechargeable Battery Pack for Digital Rebel XT/XTi, PowerShot S30/40/45/50/60/70/80 & G7 Digital Cameras - Canon $50.54
Canon 430EX Speedlite Flash for Canon Pro1, Pro 90, G Series and all EOS SLR Cameras $220.00
Sunpak 8001UT Tripod with Extra Quick-Release Mounting Plate - SUNPAK $32
Canon Deluxe Photo Backpack 200EG for Canon EOS SLR Cameras -
$37 REQUIRED
Canon Wireless Remote Control RC1 for Digital Rebel - 26$

SanDisk SDCFH-2048-901 2GB ULTRA II CF Card (Retail Package) - SanDisk

$33.99

I could of also bought the camera w/ the kit lens, but i left the lenses out for the moment so i could analyze the lenses that would be best for me. My question is (please read the other forum posts 1st) I want lenses that are good for all around use, and for the hobby, and for the situatin posted in the previous forum. It comes out i could use 200mm lens for that, then crop for my final picture. The kit above comes out to [/b]$903.29 . My spending limit is 1200$ with the ability to go SLGIHTLY over if neccessary. Wat lenses would be good for me?
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Old May 13, 2007, 3:14 PM   #2
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IMO, you're not going to have enough budget left over to buy a lens suitable for indoor use without a flash with that kit, especially since you're going to need a longer lens for your desired speaker shots.

Look... I realize you want to take photos of speakers indoors that are better than what you got with a Kodak DX6490.

That means you're going to need a brighter lens, as well as higher available ISO speeds. The reason you were getting so many blurry photos was because your shutter speed was only 1/10 second shooting at f/3.7 at a focal length equivalent to 380mm on a 35mm camera using it's Auto ISO (which was probably between ISO 200 and ISO 320), and even if you used a tripod (or a table and self timer like you were doing with the Kodak), you'll need faster shutter speeds to help out with blur from subject movement.

With a consumer grade (i.e., a $200) lens, your not going to improve things a lot, if any at all. Even if you went to ISO 1600, if you only have f/5.6 available (which is what these consumer grade 70-300mm type lenses have on their long end), your shutter speeds would still only be around 1/15 to 1/30 second in that lighting. That won't cut it for a higher percentage of keepers for tightly frame head and shoulders type shots.

You may improve the odds a little with practice (waiting for pauses in the speeches). But, most of these less expensive lenses are not very sharp on their long ends at wide open apertures (which you'd need to use without a flash). I'd find a better way to go.

Existing light photos indoors are very demanding on a camera, and a brighter lens is a must have from my perspective. Brighter means larger, heavier and more expensive. That's just the way it is. They have to be larger and heavier to let in enough light so that the camera can "expose" the image faster (using faster shutter speeds so you'll have less blur from subject movement).

A tripod will be a must have in the conditions you were shooting in, even with a brighter lens. What you need to concentrate on is a lens that gets your shutter speeds fast enough to get a higher percentage of keepers without motion blur from subject movement, otherwise you'll have the same issues with a DSLR

I'll let the Canon shooters make some suggestions. But, if I were you, and those indoor photos of speakers were my highest priority, I'd try to find a used 70-200mm f/2.8 (Sigma or similar) zoom and crop the photo a tad if you can't get closer than you were shooting with your Kodak at a focal length equivalent to 380mm.

A lens like that would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 320mm lens on a 35mm camera. So, you wouldn't be very far off what you were getting for framing with the Kodak DX6490.

That's going to cost you more than you've got left over for a used lens like that. So, you may want to consider trimming the kit. For example, leaving out the flash (since you indicated that flash photos were not permitted in the speaking engagements anyway).

To be blunt, your budget is not adequate for everything you want to shoot, even if you go used.

So, you'll have to make some hard choices. I'll let the Canon shooters make other lens/kit suggestions that may keep you within budget. But, any solution with your budget is probably going to leave you lacking in one area or another.

Can you not get any closer for the indoor photos? That would be one way to lower your costs, since you could find some suitable primes if you could go with a shorter focal length.


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Old May 13, 2007, 3:31 PM   #3
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P.S.

Another option would be to just stick with that Kodak DX6490, using higher ISO speeds (versus Auto ISO) using software to perform some noise reduction, until you do have the budget for higher quality lenses for a DSLR.

I just don't see where you'd be improving anything trying to use a longer $200 zoom indoors without a flash on a DSLR. I'll let the Canon shooters make some suggestions, as they're going to be more familiar with the available choices.


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Old May 13, 2007, 3:52 PM   #4
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Here's a used Tokina 80-200mm f2.8 for under $500:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._80_200mm.html


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Old May 13, 2007, 5:53 PM   #5
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I like the idea of stting my camera to 800 iso and using noise ninja( which i have , but never used it). I dont know the power it has, but maybe it could help alot. What do you think of the lens that was posted in the link in the previous post. Is it good?

The other thing i would like to know is what lens should i get for a mid-ranged lens. (better than the kit) that has a little more zoom range. I will only use it outdoors, or indoors w/ a flash. Keep it under 300$. I would also appreciate more tips for a 200mm lens
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Old May 13, 2007, 6:20 PM   #6
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I haven't used one. The Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 tends to be more popular.

But, by most accounts the Tokina models are well made lenses.

The main question is if the sharpness at wider apertures would be acceptable.

Most lenses you'll find for a DSLR will be a little softer at their widest aperture setting (f/2.8 in this case), and if you stop down the lens (use a smaller aperture, represented by a higher f/stop number), you decrease the light getting through. So,it's a good idea to take sharpness at wider apertures into consideration if you really need to use a lens that way.

I found an MTF chart on one Tokina 80-200mm f/2.8. There tend to be some differences betwen models over the years. So, it may not be the same lens that was mentioned.

http://old.photodo.com/prod/lens/tokina.shtml#Tokina

Here's a direct link to the chart:

http://old.photodo.com/prod/lens/det...0_28-847.shtml

Center sharpness doesn't look too bad to my eyes (although it does get a bit software towards the edges of the frame). Since you'd be using the "sweet spot" of the lens on a DSLR with an APS-C sensor, this may not be a big consideration for portrait type images.

But, users in at least one performance survey rate at http://www.photozone.de has it rated as "poor" on the long end when used on a DSLR at wide open apertures. That's not a good sign. But, I tend to take user opinions with a "grain of salt", since expectations of quality can play a big role, and some users may not realize that camera shake is contributing to softness at longer zoom settings.

User opinions at http://www.fredmiranda.com are a bit better. I only noticed one user mentioning it was soft unless stopped down.

I'll let the Canon users comment on specific lenses. You've got lots of choices available (from Canon, Tokina, Tamron and others).


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