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Old Sep 22, 2007, 7:05 PM   #1
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after countless hours of going though forums, reviews, pics ive desided on the canon xti. so, now i would like to know what would be a good first, general use lens. i would like to keep it 150 or under, but if its a little over, im sure my budget would allow that small ammount more.
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Old Sep 22, 2007, 7:57 PM   #2
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Have you considered the kit lens (Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 AF lens).

It doesn't add much to the cost of the camera if you get it in a kit when you buy the camera.

It's not the brightest or highest quality lens around. But, it's small and light and reasonably priced, and you're not going to find a lot of options in your price range if you want something to cover the wide end, too. That's one reason the manufacturers bundle it that way (because it can handle the typical focal range many users want to shoot at on a budget).

Then, perhaps something like a 50mm f/1.8 AF lens to go with it. That's a very good and bright lens (it's just not a zoom). So, it could come in handy for low light use, portraits and more. It's less than $100. That would get you started.

Then, after you've used the camera and lenses for a while, you'd have a better idea of where you may need something different (for example, a longer focal length lens for sports and wildlife use) for what you like to shoot.

BTW, I moved this thread down to our Canon Lenses forum for you. That way, Canon shooters can offer suggestions.

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Old Sep 22, 2007, 8:46 PM   #3
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Agreed. You did not mention what you want to shoot. What you want to shoot and lens choice are intimately realted.

Although most Lenses tend to cost a lot more then your have bugeted. Digital lenses (Ones that are designed for the smaller imaging area of DSLR) tend to be better quality,less expensive then lenses for full frame senors. Most Dslrlike the Rebel xti use a APC sized sensor, huge compared to a digicam sensorbut about40 percentsmaller then a full frame sensor in a film or full frame digital.

**The kits lensJim recomended is a bargain, under a $100 and goes wide to slightly tele.**

As he mentioned For around $85 you can also pick up a Prime likea Canon 50mm 1.8 that will be faster, for when you need to gather more light or capture action.

For point of refrence a Tamron 17-50 that is much better quality runsmore like $420 and Canon's eqavalant lens with IS is closer to a $1000.

Like with everything thereare tools (lens and or Camera) for every budget and job. And of course at some point their are dimminshing returns to an extent. Many would argue that theTamron and Canonother then the IS are very close, with each having their own strength and weaknesses.

If yourwondering what you get for spending more. You get a Sharper, fasterlens. **With the Kit lens you'll want to stop down more to get better shots.

Hence the reasonJim also recomended the Prime 50mm 1.8 it has the properties ofthe more expensivezoom with out theprice. The down side. Yourfeet do the zooming andyou can not alwaysget far enoughaway from your subjects in tight quarters.

There is nothing that is perfect. Everything is a design and cost compromise of some sort.


Good Luck.


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Old Sep 23, 2007, 12:51 PM   #4
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I would say you can't go wrong with the kit lens at the budget you are looking at. My kit lens is actually quite good - I may have gotten lucky though. The kit lens will allow you to have everything from a little wide angle to a little telephoto. Once you have learned the new camera and lens, you can decide where you want to go next. Sometimes you can get the kit for nearly the same price as the body only, so keep your eyes open for deals (assuming you don't have the camera yet and you're looking at the Digital Rebel XT or XTi).
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Old Sep 23, 2007, 2:09 PM   #5
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i have no idea why i didnt see this before, or even care to look, but i have about 150 bucks worth in 1 and 2 gig sd cards, and the canon xt is compact flash....so, my best bet would have to be the nokon d40.
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Old Sep 23, 2007, 2:37 PM   #6
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Have you priced memory cards lately?

They've come down in price a lot. So, even if you paid $150 for them when you bought them, you could probably buy higher capacity cards for less.

A good place to shop for memory cards is http://www.newegg.com

Heck, they even have some relatively fast 4GB CompactFlash cards for under $40 now. lol

So, I wouldn't base my camera decision on a handful of existing SD cards.

You'll find pros and cons to any camera model. The D40 is a well liked camera. But, it's more restrictive on the types of lenses you can use if you want Autofocus. For example, Nikon also makes a 50mm f/1.8 at a very good price that would make a good lens for low light shooting and more. But, it won't Autofocus on a D40, because this particular camera model doesn't have a focus motor built into it (and neither does that lens). The same issue would apply to most inexpensive third party zooms (no Autofocus on a D40). Only Nikkor AF-S or Sigma HSM lenses will autofocus on that particular camera model.

Do you need something other than those lens types? I don't know. That's why it's a good idea to let members know what conditions you plan on using a camera in. Low light sports or existing light shooting indoors may require a totally different approach compared to landscapes outside.

Any choice is going to be a compromise in one area or another. ;-)

It sounds like you're not really sure what you need. What I'd suggest is starting a new post in our What Camera Should I Buy Forum

Let members know what your total budget is, what you like to shoot, and the conditions you want to use a camera in. Then, see what kind of responses you get and narrow your choices down from there for both a camera and lenses (and you wouldn't need to buy everything you want at the same time to get started).

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Old Sep 23, 2007, 7:10 PM   #7
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Agreed. And 2B CF Flash or any memory card are about $20.

A 2GB card is enough to take Over 100 RAW and Jpeg images or many 100s of Jpeg only (but you'll learn to want the RAW files with the Jpeg.
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Old Sep 28, 2007, 7:31 PM   #8
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WhichEVER you get, you will NOT get sharp images (at least by my standard) directly out of the camera with ANY lens under $200...especially Canon which has a filter in the body, infront of the sensor, to minimize jagged lines and such...so sharpening is a must...in my xt when I shoot jpeg images I set the sharpness to the max.

To answer your Canon question...
the 18-55kit lens is the ONLY lens that will give you a wide angle for under $100.
a sigma 55-200 will cost you $100 and that gives you a range of18mm-200mm (which given thecropped sensor= 29mm-320mm view on a 35mm camera)...

good luck.
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Old Sep 30, 2007, 11:33 PM   #9
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Don't know why but I forgot to mention the 24-85mm Canon EF...it goes for about 150-175 used...very nice lens.
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Old Oct 15, 2007, 9:20 AM   #10
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digikita wrote:
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WhichEVER you get, you will NOT get sharp images (at least by my standard) directly out of the camera with ANY lens under $200...especially Canon which has a filter in the body, infront of the sensor, to minimize jagged lines and such...

Don't all dSLR sensors have these?
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